The Ashab-e-Kahf For Today’s Youth

Ashab e Kahf

Transcribed for hiba by Asma Imran

I would like to highlight some lessons from the story of the Ashab-e-Kahf (People of the Cave) which I feel are significantly missing in Muslim discourse especially those related to our youth.

Withdrawal from Mainstream Culture

The first thing I want to talk about is the cultural onslaught. The People of the Cave drew themselves away from the dominant culture when they observed that it was overwhelmingly evil. Actually, a verdict was passed against them according to which they were to be executed as a result of their faith; so they pulled themselves out.

One of the most important lessons to draw from this is that until our lives are in danger, we have to engage with the society. As Muslims, we cannot have the attitude that we are not going to mingle in the society because everything outside is a Fitnah from which we have to protect and shelter ourselves, and the only way we are going to preserve our faith is by totally shutting ourselves out from the outside world. This means that we’ve already accepted defeat. It says that everybody else is attacking us, and we’ve got to save ourselves by pulling back and staying strong within our fort.

However, the entire idea of Islam and the imagery that Allah (swt) presents of Islam is that of truth being hurled against falsehood. Allah (swt) gives the image of truth being like a weapon and falsehood being the victim and running away. Thus, the truth is attacking falsehood, and falsehood is on the run. So who’s on the offense and who’s on the defence? Who’s actually questioning the wrong happening in our society and engaging with it and saying: “We are here to change things?” That’s the truth. And who’s actually supposed to go into hiding? That’s supposed to be falsehood.

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Hajj 2015 – the Good I Witnessed

hajj2015

It might be startling for many to believe that there was any good in Hajj 2015, especially after the unfortunate tragedies of the crane crash and Mina stampede. May Allah swt accept the Shahadah (martyrdom) of those who lost their lives. But I was there performing my very first pilgrimage to Bait-ul-Allah. It was an ethereal experience.

The system in place to manage 30 lac pilgrims was quite impressive. The exits and entrances to Masjid al Haram were efficiently monitored to prevent any crowd surges. Policemen were lined up with spray bottles filled with cold water, ready to spray at any face that wanted respite from the heat. Free potable water and juice cartons were distributed to weary Hajis trudging on foot. Free bus rides were arranged from Khana-e-Kaabah to other parts of the city from where one could either walk home or hail a cab. Eager volunteers were present to guide you to your destination sometimes in sign language if you didn’t speak Arabic. Public toilets were present after every few meters and were considerably usable for Wudu and to answer the call of nature.

And who can forget the call of the beautiful Adhan soring high in the Haram. It raised the hair on one’s back, lifted the lowest of Imans, brought tears to eyes blurring the black majestic Kabah ahead. Each worshipper poured his heart out to his Rabb. Everyone had a love story of his own to narrate. Their hands stretched out yearning for the Lord’s Mercy and Love. It was the moment. All else faded away in the background.

Hajj was truly a picture of supreme brotherhood. Muslims from all continents and of every colour praying in one direction, to one God in one language.  We shared food, water, our prayer mats and smiles. We tried conversing in sign language, broken English and wavering Arabic. We pushed wheel chairs of complete strangers and shared taxi rides with them too.

Personally three things helped me immensely. I embarked on the pilgrimage with my husband with zero expectations. I realized that if I was a guest of Allah (swt) I had to trust and respect His hospitality. This meant no complaining and exhibiting patience. And believe me this submission to Allah (swt) worked wonders. We were always pleasantly surprised since we expected nothing.

Hajj is not a vacation. If you want to go on a holiday you should trek to Bali or Dubai maybe. Hajj is serious worship

Secondly offering Sadqah every day in the morning reassured our faith. Be it the cleaners at the Haram or old and frail Hajis, we felt a sense of tranquility to be able to help the lesser privileged. In return we asked of Allah’s (swt) pleasure and mercy in our affairs.

Lastly the prayer of Ibrahim (as) “Husbiy allaha wanaimal wakeel” was a fort against every forwarding trouble in sight. He recited these words when he was thrown into the fire by King Namrood. Allah (swt) had commanded the fire to cool down and offer safety to prophet Ibrahim instead and he walked away unhurt. Hence I relied on the same prayer for the slightest of issues possible. Be it long queues, day’s heat, big crowds, wait for the cab, chance to enter the Haram gates, possibility of Tawaf, etc.

On a closing note, Hajj is not a vacation. If you want to go on a holiday you should trek to Bali or Dubai maybe. Hajj is serious worship. It is meant for the ones who want to grow spiritually and are ready to offer sacrifices of their everyday comforts and conveniences. It’s not for those who think that since they are wealthy enough they should embark on it as they are an eligible candidate for it. If we wish to have our entire life’s sins wiped out, we will have to pay some price.

A very highly recommended exercise for those who wish to perform Hajj next year would be to read a good book on the Prophet’s (sa) Seerah

A very highly recommended exercise for those who wish to perform Hajj next year would be to read a good book on the Prophet’s (sa) Seerah right before they advance for their pilgrimage. It will help them greatly appreciate the lofty sacrifices Muhammad (sa) made for us. At Hajj we could pray anywhere in the Haram, perform as many Tawaf as possible in the ocean of other pilgrims, behold the captivating sight of the breathless Kabah. But Prophet (sa) was beaten at the same place so many times by the disbelievers of Makkah in the first thirteen years of his prophethood for simply offering Salah on the same grounds. And finally he was driven out of the city.

We can today peacefully go for Hajj and worship lovingly all we can. The inconveniences we face in this journey should not even be mentioned if we remember what our Prophet (sa) bore in the way of Allah (swt).

“By the fig, and the olive. By Mount Sinai. By this city of security (Makkah).” (Surat  at- tin 95:1-3)

Lessons of Bravery from Asma Bint Yazid (ra)

flowerwoodChoice of Friends

Asma (ra) was much older than the Mother of the Believers Aisha (ra), yet she would visit her often to seek knowledge. Their relationship was based on mutual love and truthfulness. Their conversations were generally about issues of jurisprudence, and not gossips about the community.

Lessons to draw: Raise the standard of your friends. Genuinely reach out for people who are better than you in Deen. Respect and benefit from their knowledge. Knowing our time is precious, we must not waste it in Laghw (futile); but rather, look for opportunities to benefit ourselves and others. We must actively seek opportunities that will raise our scales in the hereafter. We should also polish our skills and be a productive member of the society.

Raise the standard of your friends. Genuinely reach out for people who are better than you in Deen.

Blessing in Food

Asma (ra) had a small place for prayer in her courtyard. Sometimes, the Prophet (sa) would go there to pray. One day when he arrived, Asma (ra) presented him food. The Prophet (sa) instructed his accompanying Companions (ra) to join him in the dinner. The Prophet (sa), the Companions (ra) and the family ate from the meal, and much was left over. There must have been forty people who shared the meal together.

The Prophet (sa) then got up and drank water from the leather flask. Asma (ra) preserved that flask and would use it when someone in the family fell ill. When a sick person would be served water from it, he would be cured. It was all because of the blessings of the Prophet (sa).

Lessons to draw: We might not have the Prophet (sa) among us anymore, but we learn that sharing our provision with others always brings more. We must be generous in sharing our food, our skills, our time and our knowledge with others- especially those who need it the most.

To increase the blessing in one’s provision one must also learn and follow the etiquette that our Prophet (sa) taught. Among them some are: it should be Halal (permissible) and Tayyab (pure). Therefore, purify your source of income and thoughts. Do not be greedy and selfish. Have concern for others too. Start every good deed and daily habits such as eating or sleeping with the name of Allah (swt).

We must be generous in sharing our food, our skills, our time and our knowledge with others- especially those who need it the most.

Narrator of Hadeeth

Being a regular student of the gatherings of the Prophet (sa) and Aisha (ra), Asma (ra) attained the honour of being a Hadeeth narrator. Around eighty one Ahadeeth have been narrated from her.

Lessons to draw: We cannot be a Hadeeth narrator, but how many Ahadeeth do we know by our hearts? Let us set up a Hadeeth memorising goal and memorise some.

Participation in Battles

Asma (ra) dedicated the early years of her marriage in tending to her home. When the children grew up and became independent, she used her skills and time for Allah (swt). She participated with the men in the battles. Not only as a nurse attending to the wounded, and supporting the men, but also as a warrior.  She had no weapons of her own and no means to procure one. She took the pole of her tent and killed nine enemy soldiers in the Battle of Uhud.

Around eighty one Ahadeeth have been narrated from her.

She lived up to a ripe age and later moved to Damascus where she died. She was one of the women promised Paradise.

Lessons to draw: We see in the life of Asma (ra) many roles. She was a student, a teacher, Hadeeth narrator, and a warrior. She performed all those roles, while efficiently performing her domestic duties. She felt no humiliation in doing house chores. At one point in her life, she was divorced. But, she continued to benefit herself and others. She did not allow anything to put a blockade in her determination to gather Hasanahs (good deeds) for herself.

Asma (ra) teaches us to raise our scales. She teaches us to prioritise our duties and bring a balance in them. She teaches us to keep moving, despite the challenges that we encounter.

(Adapted from the book: Seerat e Sahabiyat k Darakshan Pehlu by Mehmood Ahmad Ghazanfar and the lectures of Dr. Farhat Hashmi: Seerat e Sahabiyat)

Five Ways to Cleanse Your Thoughts

11775The Quran contains details of the previous nations so that we may take heed and not repeat their mistakes. Allah (swt) mentions the tales of both the obedient and the disobedient, giving us a choice as to which group we want to be from.

When the obedient people received a command from Allah (swt), they surrendered before Him and accepted it right away. For example, when Prophet Ibrahim (as) was asked to submit: “He said: I have submitted myself (as a Muslim) to the Lord of the Alamin (mankind, Jinns and all that exists).” (Al-Baqarah 2:131) No further questions.

When the other group was commanded to do something- they transgressed, rejected and ridiculed the message. For example: “And (remember) when Musa (Moses) said to his people: Verily, Allah commands you that you slaughter a cow. They said: Do you make fun of us? He said: I take Allah’s Refuge from being among Al-Jahilun (the ignorant or the foolish).” (Al-Baqarah 2:67) A prophet does not make fun of others. He is sincere to his cause and wishes the best for everyone.

Why did they deduce a different meaning than the one intended?

The problem was in their thinking. They did not give due respect to their messenger; they always undermined his sincerity and harmed themselves.

Often in life, we make the same mistakes. Without understanding the intentions of others, we engage in arguments, risk relationships, and see only one side of the coin. This is called mental slavery. Generally, people fashion their thoughts based on their experiences and not the truth. This promotes racism, hatred, and other evils. But, we do not need to live in this slavery – we can change it.

And here is how:

1. Study Your Thoughts
Before you react to a conversation or any event, pause and think. What makes me think what I am thinking right now? Is that really the truth or am I being biased? Recognize your biasness. And throw it out.

2. Restrict the Ego from Taking Over
Social media threads and political talk shows often end up in arguments and severed ties because each participant allows his or her ego to take over. Allow other people to have their opinions. The way your thoughts were shaped by your environment and experiences, the other person went through a similar process. He is entitled to think differently. Give respect. Do not abuse.

3. Broaden Your Information Sources
Diversify your information bank. Do not always read or follow opinions that match yours. Pick up a book or listen to someone who thinks differently. Similarly, improve your company. Seek learned, truthful, respectful, and positive thinkers. Seek the truth, not attention.

4. Stay Busy
Knowing that every word spilling off our tongues is being recorded should encourage us to speak only when spoken to. Speak a good word, and do not always be opinionated.

5. Study the Seerah of the Prophets
Learn from the best. Allah (swt) chose and shaped the prophets to overcome life’s challenges and carry forward His message. The Companions adopted their teachings and moulded themselves. Study their lives. How did they live in this world while focusing on the hereafter?

Life Lessons from Asma Bint Abu Bakr (ra) – 2

cherryclossomWe continue with some more characteristics of Asma bint Abu Bakr (ra).

Steadfastness in Religion

When Asma (ra) migrated to Madinah, her mother Qutalyah bint Abdul Uzza came for a visit bringing along some gifts. Her mother being an idolatress, Asma (ra) did not admit her into the house or accept her gifts, until she asked the Prophet (sa) about relations with the idolaters. The Prophet (sa) told her to welcome her mother and accept her gifts.

It was her Taqwa that made her rank Allah (swt) and His commandments above everything else. If she was unclear about a certain matter, she did not proceed on her own, until she received clarification regarding it. “And whosoever honours the Symbols of Allah, then it is truly from the piety of the heart.” (Al-Hajj 22:32)

Lessons to draw: Seek knowledge of the religion and protect yourself and your families from committing that, which might be displeasing to Allah (swt). Be conscious of your earning, your food, your clothing, and the kind of people you keep company with. Put Allah (swt) before everything else.

Perseverance and Generosity

Life for Asma (ra) wasn’t easy. Her husband Zubair (ra) had neither money nor property. Asma (ra) would do house chores as well as look after her husband’s mare. Tending to the mare was the most difficult of all jobs. When she complained to her father, he advised her to be patient.

It was her Taqwa that made her rank Allah (swt) and His commandments above everything else.

When Allah (swt) improved their financial condition, instead of increasing her living status, Asma (ra) increased her charity. She was a woman not blinded by the attractions of this world. She was focused on the hereafter and that which pleased Allah (swt). Advising her children of benevolence, she said: “Spend, give Sadaqah and charity and do not wait for abundance.”

Lessons to draw: Many women complain of not having enough to give. There are many simple ways of contributing in the way of Allah (swt), and it does not always involve money. One can contribute in the way of Allah (swt) by giving their time, talent, special skills or even provision. Prepare an extra meal one day and feed an orphan child. Volunteer to teach Quran, a Dua or even academic studies to one of your domestic help’s children.

Haya and Modesty

One day, Asma (ra) was walking home with a load of dates on her head. Upon seeing her, the Prophet (sa) signalled his camel to sit down, so that Asma (ra) could climb. But Asma (ra) refused and continued to walk. There were other men with Prophet (sa), and Asma (ra) did not find it appropriate to be the only woman in a group of men.

Once, her son Al-Mundhir sent her an elegant dress from Iraq, but Asma (ra) refused to take it. Her son, knowing his mother, contested that it was not of a transparent material. Asma (ra) replied that it was not, but it was of tight-fitting and revealed the contours of the body.

Lessons to draw: We might spend a fortune on looking elegant and distinguished, but does our clothing cover all the parameters of Haya? Let us dress up to please Allah (swt).

When Allah (swt) improved their financial condition, instead of increasing her living status, Asma (ra) increased her charity.

Motherhood

Asma (ra) instilled in her children religious values and instructed them about always standing up for the truth. She transferred her love for charity in them and raised them upon best characteristics. After her husband divorced her, Asma (ra) started living with her son Abdullah ibn Az-Zubair (ra). Raised by his mother, Abdullah (ra) grew up to be prudent, intellectual and a master archer.

Lessons to draw: Connect your children to Allah (swt), because when the hearts are empty, they would take in anything that Shaytan leads them to. Teach the Seerah of the Prophet (sa) and his Duas. Tell them about Shirk, and teach not to depend on anyone or fear anyone besides Allah (swt).

Adapted from the book: Seerat e Sahabiyat k Darakshan Pehlu and the lectures of Dr. Farhat Hashmi: Seerat e Sahabiyat.

Life Lessons from Asma Bint Abu Bakr (ra) – 1

beach-and-yellow-flower-wallpaper1Asma bint Abu Bakr (ra) – the daughter of the Prophet’s (sa) closest companion Abu Bakr Siddique (ra), the sister of the Prophet’s beloved wife Aishah (ra), the wife of another companion of Rasulullah (sa) Zubair ibn Al-Awwam (ra), and the mother of another eminent companion Abdullah ibn Az-Zubair – has a lot to her credit.

When Abu Bakr Siddique (ra) accepted Islam, he rushed to spread the message in his family. While his wife Qutaylah bint Abdul Uzza refused, his two children including Asma (ra) readily embraced it. She is a woman known for her piety, farsightedness, courage, and generosity. Let’s look at her characteristics individually.

Problem Solving

When the Prophet (sa) and Abu Bakr (ra) were seeking refuge in the cave of Thawr, Asma (ra) came to deliver them food and water. But, she did not have a piece of rope or string to tie the food with. Acting on instinct, she tore her girdle (or waist-wrapper) into two and tied the items to the camels. This act got her the title of Dhat Al-Nitaqayn (she of the two girdles).

She grew up seeing her father looking for solutions and helping others, rather than creating hurdles or panicking. 

She was the daughter of the man, who rushed to serve Allah (swt) and the Prophet of Allah (sa). She grew up seeing her father looking for solutions and helping others, rather than creating hurdles or panicking. When she was in a tough situation herself, she did not refrain from looking for solutions.

Lessons to draw

Become a problem solver. Look for opportunities. If Allah (swt) has put you in this, He will definitely bring you out. Have you considered all the options?

Courage

When the Prophet (sa) and Abu Bakr (ra) left for Madinah, their greatest enemy Abu Jahl began searching for them frantically. Not finding them anywhere, he came to Abu Bakr’s house enraged and asked for him. Asma (ra) replied that she did not know where her father was. Abu Jahl, drowned in insolence, slapped Asma (ra) hard. But this courageous woman did not falter or betray her father’s secret.

Lessons to draw

Be strong. Life will throw you challenges that you need to stand up to. Fear none because our belief is:

“Nothing shall ever happen to us, except what Allah has ordained for us.” (At-Taubah 9:51)

Intelligence and Wisdom

Each time the Prophet (sa) called out to people to spend in the way of Allah (swt), we read that Abu Bakr (ra) was the foremost and the most generous. Upon seeing all that he brought, he would be asked, if he left anything for his dependents. He would reply that he left Allah (swt) and His Prophet (sa) for them. When the command to migrate came, Abu Bakr (ra) gathered all his wealth and financed the journey.

Complain less and become a source of comfort, instead. Cover up for others and Allah (swt) will cover up for you, Insha’Allah.

His father, Abu Quhafa, was not unaware of his son’s benevolence. When he learnt of his son’s migration to Madinah, he said to his granddaughter that her father had put them in adversity and deprived them of himself and property. Asma (ra), the courageous daughter of a brave man, did not allow her grandfather’s comments to weaken her resilience. Instead of complaining of her father’s attitude, she replied: “No, he left so much to us.” She covered some stones and brought them to her grandfather and said: “This is what he left.” Being blind, Abu Quhafa could not see what he was touching, so he said: “There is no blame, if he left that.” Asma (ra) not only covered up for her father, but she desired to comfort her grandfather as well.

Lessons to draw

Keep your private matters private. Complain less and become a source of comfort, instead. Cover up for others and Allah (swt) will cover up for you, Insha’Allah.

Adapted from the book: Seerat-e-Sahabiyat k Darakshan Pehlu and the lectures of Dr. Farhat Hashmi: Seerat-e-Sahabiyat

Lessons in Love from Khadijah bint Khuwaylid (rtaf)

8 lessons in loveProphet Muhammad (sa) is the ultimate role model for all Muslims, men and women, as we are all commanded by Allah (swt) in the Quran to follow the Messenger’s (sa) Sunnah. We look upon him as our guide. He possessed the best of manners, the noblest of character, and was the best husband to his wives. I am sure every Muslim woman wants her husband to emulate the example of the Prophet (sa), and to experience the deep love and tranquillity of married life just as the wives of the Prophet (sa) did. Yet we have to remember that marriage and love is a shared responsibility. If we want our husbands to resemble Prophet Muhammad (sa) in their conduct, we ourselves should also strive to be more like the Mothers of the Believers. Every one of these great women has a lesson we can learn from. If we want to become the best and most loving wives to our husbands, we should learn more about Khadijah bint Khuwaylid (rtaf), the first and the most beloved wife of the Prophet (sa).

Khadijah bint Khuwaylid (rtaf) was born into a rich Makkan family. She inherited great wealth from her father, which she further multiplied by her successful business ventures. She used to send caravans with goods to neighbouring countries, and she would put trusted employees in charge of her merchandise. Having heard of the young man who was known in Makkah as al-Amin (the trustworthy), she decided to employ him. Khadijah (rtaf) sent with him her old and trusted slave, Maysarah, so that he could report to her about his dealings. The man she employed was no other than Muhammad (sa). Khadijah (rtaf) was so impressed by the success of his business trip, as well as by what Maysarah told her about him, that she became inclined to marry him.

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[Video] Loving the Prophet (sa)

Here is a brief but amazing lecture by Mufti Ismail Menk on how to love the Prophet (sa), and glad tidings given in the Quran that those who love him and obey him will be near him on the Day of Judgement and in Jannah as well. This is mentioned in Surah an-Nisa:

“And whoever obeys Allah and the Messenger – those will be with the ones upon whom Allah has bestowed favor of the prophets, the steadfast affirmers of truth, the martyrs and the righteous. And excellent are those as companions.” (An-Nisa 4:69)

Inspirational Real Life Marriage Stories

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What is true marital love? Let’s take a look at some examples found in true stories:

 Exchange of Lovely Compliments

Once, the Prophet (sa) was sitting in a room with Aisha (rtaf) and fixing his shoes. It was very warm. Aisha (rtaf) looked at his blessed forehead and noticed that there were beads of sweat on it. She became overwhelmed by the majesty of that sight. She stared at him long enough for him to notice. He asked, “What’s the matter?”

She replied: “If Abu Bukair Al-Huthali, the poet, saw you, he would know that his poem was written for you.”

The Prophet (sa) asked: “What did he say?”

She replied: “Abu Bukair said that if you look at the majesty of the moon, it twinkles and lights up the world for everybody to see.”

The Prophet (sa) got up, walked to Aisha (rtaf), kissed her between the eyes, and said: “By Allah, O Aisha, you are like that to me and more.” (Baihaqi)

Reassurance of Love

Aisha (rtaf) and the Prophet (sa) would use code language with each other denoting their love. She asked the Prophet (sa) how he would describe his love for her. Prophet Muhammad (sa) answered: “Like a strong binding knot.” The more you tug, the stronger it gets, in other words.

Every so often Aisha (rtaf) would playfully ask: “How is the knot?” The Prophet (sa) would answer: “As strong as the first day (you asked).” Then, he said: “By Allah, nothing will harm me in this life, when I know that you will be my wife in Paradise.” (Abu Nuaym in Hilyat al-Awliya, 2/44; quoted by Hafiz Ibn Hajar in Lisan al-Mizan, no. 760, Ash-Shawkani in Al-Fawaid, no.1180)

Keeping an Eye on the Real Prize

According to the scholars (Ulema), there was once a very beautiful woman married to a dark man, whose features made him look extremely strange and scary. They were both, however, very happy together, because both were very righteous individuals, who were devoted to Allah (swt). One day, the husband happened to smile in happiness, as he looked at his wife, and at this, she said: “We are the entrants of Paradise.” Her husband asked how she came to know this, and she continued: “When you look at me, you smile in gratitude, and when I look at you, I exercise patience. A Hadeeth says that both the grateful and the patient shall enter Paradise.” (“Islam and Marriage” by Shaykh Zulfiqar Ahmad)

Consideration for the Other

Aisha (rtaf) relates: “By Allah, I saw the Prophet Muhammad (sa) standing at the door of my room when some Abyssinians were playing with spears in the mosque. The Messenger of Allah (sa) screened me with his cloak so that I could watch the spear-play over his shoulder. He stayed there for my sake until I had seen enough.” (Bukhari)

While on a journey, Prophet Musa’s (as) wife had to stop because of a headache. Musa (as) told her to rest while he fetched firewood to build a fire for warmth. Here we have an excellent example in which we see prophets engaged in providing ease and comfort to their wives. Hence, men should not shy away from any kind of work and responsibility but embrace the opportunity. (“Islam and Marriage” by Shaykh Zulfiqar Ahmad)

Being Patient for the Sake of Love

The son of Abu Talhah (rtam) and Umm Sulaim (rtaf) had been ailing. Abu Talhah (rtam) set out on a journey, and his son breathed his last in his absence. Very worried that her husband would be extremely saddened at the news, Umm Sulaim (rtaf) she sat contemplating what she should do. She then bathed the child’s body and laid it in the cot with a blanket over it. She requested her family members to not inform Abu Talhah (rtam) about the child’s death immediately.

When Abu Talhah (rtam) came back, he asked (his wife): “What about my child?” Umm Sulaim (rtaf) said: “He is now in a more comfortable state than before.”

The husband hence thought the child was sleeping. The couple ate together, discussed his trip, and retired for the night.

The next morning, she said: “Abu Talhah, if some people borrow something from another family and then the members of the family ask for its return, would they resist its return? He said: “No.” She said: “I inform you about the death of your son.”

He was annoyed at that. Later, Abu Talhah (rtam) came to Allah’s Messenger (sa) and informed him about this. Whereupon, he asked: “Did you spend the night with her?” He answered: “Yes.” The Prophet (sa) then supplicated: O Allah, bless both of them.”

As a result of this blessing, Umm Sulaim (rtaf) gave birth to a child. The Prophet (sa) named him Abdullah. (Muslim)

When They Disagreed Before the Prophet (sa)

disagreement before Prophet (sa)

He (sa) Let Him Go

Abu Saeed Al-Khudri (rtam) narrated: “Ali bin Abu Talib (rtam) sent a piece of gold, not yet taken out of its ore, in a tanned leather container to Allah’s Messenger (sa). Allah’s Messenger (sa) distributed that amongst four persons: Uyainah bin Badr (rtam), Aqra bin Habis (rtam), Zaid Al-Khalil (rtam) and the fourth was either Alqamah (rtam) or Amr bin Tufail (rtam). On that, one of his companions said: ‘We are more deserving of this (gold) than these (persons).’ When the news reached the Prophet (sa), he said: ‘Don’t you trust me, though I am the trustworthy man of the One in the heavens, and I receive the news of the heavens (i.e., Divine Revelation) both in the morning and in the evening?’ There got up a man with sunken eyes, raised cheek bones, raised forehead, a thick beard, a shaven head and a waist sheet that was tucked up and he said: ‘O Allah’s Messenger! Be afraid of Allah.’ The Prophet (sa) said: ‘Woe to you! Am I not of all the people of the earth the most entitled to fear Allah?’ Then, that man went away. Khalid bin Al-Waleed (rtam) said: ‘O Allah’s Messenger! Shall I chop his neck off?’ The Prophet (sa) said: ‘No, maybe he offers prayers.’ Khalid (rtam) said: ‘Numerous are those, who offer prayers and say by their tongues (i.e., mouths) what is not in their hearts.’ Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: ‘I have not been ordered (by Allah) to search the hearts of the people or cut open their bellies.’” (Bukhari)

The above incident highlights that suspicion without evidence is not permitted, especially, when a believer is under consideration. Also, if there occurs a disagreement with a stranger whom we have no previous relationship with, it is best to disregard it. We often witness or experience such disputes and squabble on the road, in the market, in the Masjid or other public places and take them to our heart. For peace to prevail, we should initiate forgiveness.

He (sa) Reconciled Amongst Them

Al-Bara (rtam) has narrated: “When the Prophet (sa) intended to perform Umrah in the month of Dhul-Qadah, the people of Makkah did not let him enter Makkah, till he settled the matter with them by promising to stay in it for three days only. When the document of the treaty was written, the following was mentioned: ‘These are the terms, on which Muhammad (sa), Allah’s Apostle agreed (to make peace).’ They said: ‘We will not agree to this, for if we believed that you are Allah’s Apostle, we would not prevent you, but you are Muhammad bin Abdullah (sa).’ The Prophet (sa) said: ‘I am Allah’s Apostle and also Muhammad bin Abdullah (sa).’ Then, he said to Ali (rtam): ‘Rub off (the words) ‘Allah’s Apostle’,’ but Ali (rtam) said: ‘No, by Allah, I will never rub off your name.’ Allah’s Apostle (sa) took the document and wrote: ‘This is what Muhammad bin Abdullah (sa) has agreed upon: No arms will be brought into Makkah, except in their cases, and nobody from the people of Makkah will be allowed to go with him (i.e., the Prophet (sa)), even if he wished to follow him, and he (the Prophet (sa)) will not prevent any of his companions from staying in Makkah, if the latter wants to stay.’ When the Prophet (sa) entered Makkah and the time limit passed, the people of Makkah went to Ali (rtam) and said: ‘Tell your friend (i.e., the Prophet (sa)) to go out, as the period (agreed to) has passed.’ The Prophet (sa) went out of Makkah. The daughter of Hamza (rtam) ran after them (i.e., the Prophet (sa) and his companions), calling: ‘O uncle! O uncle!’ Ali (rtam) received her and led her by the hand, and said to Fatimah (rtaf): ‘Take your uncle’s daughter.’ Zaid (rtam) and Jafar (rtam) quarreled about her. Ali (rtam) said: ‘I have more right to her, as she is my uncle’s daughter.’ Jafar (rtam) said: ‘She is my uncle’s daughter, and her aunt is my wife.’ Zaid (rtam) said: ‘She is my brother’s daughter.’ The Prophet (sa) judged that she should be given to her aunt, and said that the aunt was like the mother. He then said to all: ‘You are from me, and I am from you’, and said to Jafar (rtam): ‘You resemble me both in character and appearance’, and said to Zaid (rtam): ‘You are our brother (in faith) and our freed slave.’” (Bukhari)

These were men of high faith. They dedicated their lives, honour, assets, and every single blessing from Allah (swt) in his way and yet they disagreed. The point to comprehend is that Allah (swt) has not created carbon copies. We are all unique in our thoughts and actions. This is what makes the world diverse, and helps man deliver his best. The Prophet (sa) understood the Sahabah’s good intentions for the girl, and hence judged amongst them which they agreed to.

He (sa) Punished Him

Urwa bin Az-Zubair (rtam) has narrated: “Az-Zubair (rtam) told me that he quarrelled with an Ansari man, who had participated in (the battle of) Badr, in front of Allah’s Apostle (sa) about a water stream, which both of them used for irrigation. Allah’s Apostle (sa) said to Az-Zubair (rtam): ‘O Zubair! Irrigate (your garden) first and then let the water flow to your neighbour.’ The Ansari became angry and said: ‘O Allah’s Apostle! Is it because he is your cousin?’ On that, the complexion of Allah’s Apostle (sa) changed (because of anger), and he said (to Az-Zubair [rtam]): ‘Irrigate (your garden) and then withhold the water, till it reaches the walls (surrounding the palms).’ Allah’s Apostle (sa) gave Az-Zubair (rtam) his full right. Before that, Allah’s Apostle (sa) had given a generous judgement beneficial for Az-Zubair (rtam) and the Ansari, but the Ansari rejected it. Hence, Allah’s Apostle (sa) gave Az-Zubair (rtam) his full right according to the evident law. Az-Zubair (rtam) said: ‘By Allah! I think the following verse was revealed concerning that case: “But no by your Lord they can have no faith, until they make you judge in all disputes between them.” (An-Nisa 4:65)’” (Bukhari)

 

Khadijah (rta) – A Guiding Light for Every Muslimah

beautiful-hibiscus-flower-dsc02642Do you ever wish to shake hands with a political figure, or pose for the camera standing next to a high heeled model, or even meet a celebrated Islamic scholar? Khadijah (rta) had the honour of receiving greetings from the Lord of the worlds from above seven heavens.

Jibreel (as) once came to the Prophet (sa) and said: “O Allah’s Messenger! This is Khadijah (rta), coming to you with a dish having meat soup (or some food or drink). When she reaches you, greet her on behalf of her Lord, and on my behalf, and give her the glad tidings of having a palace made of Qasab in Paradise, wherein there will be neither any noise nor any toil.” (Bukhari)

Today, we will spend some time with our dear mother and study the traits of this wonderful woman, who attained the certificate of greatest achievement that can ever be; the Pleasure of the Most High and a Palace in Jannah. What made her so outstanding?

Women especially, are champions at complaining. 

The first Muslimah

Khadijah (rta) readily and instantly accepted the message of Islam, without any hesitation. She was well-aware that proclaiming this new faith would mean inviting trouble as she was surrounded by an ignorant, stereotyped society. How many of us refrain from taking a positive step with the fear of what people might say, and there she accepted the call of Islam at the cost of her life. Whilst we are not willing to pay any price for the truth, Khadijah (rta) gave up everything, teaching us a lesson; our reputation, our wealth and our community, nothing is more valuable than faith and the principles of truth.

Whilst we are not willing to pay any price for the truth, Khadijah (rta) gave up everything, teaching us a lesson; our reputation, our wealth and our community, nothing is more valuable than faith and the principles of truth.

Patience and endurance

Women especially, are champions at complaining. A woman not complaining about her servants, husband, children, in-laws and the tiniest struggles of life is very hard to find! Being the wife of the Prophet (sa), Khadijah (rta) had to face the greatest of trials.

After Qasim, Abdullah too passed away soon after he was born. Instead of sympathies and consolation that one would have expected at that grievous occasion, the pagans rejoiced at the news and started making fun of Muhammad (sa). Moreover, Abu Lahab ordered his two sons to divorce the daughters of Muhammad (sa) who were in their marriage. Weren’t these arrows hard hitting for a mother?

Later, came three difficult years of suffering and starvation in the valley of Abu Talib. However, Khadijah (rta) bore the hardships and the uncomfortable lifestyle without complaining even once.. Every other day, her neighbour Umm-e-Jameel would throw garbage in the front yard of the honourable Khadijah (rta). Did she go and scream at her husband about what she had to go through because of him? No she did not! She did have a heart, but what an enduring heart it was!

Spending in the way of Allah (swt)

“Allah (swt) would never humiliate you, for you are good to your relatives, you are true to your word, you help those who are in need, you support the weak, you feed the guest and you answer the call of those who are in distress.” This is the well-known testimony given by Khadijah (rta) about her husband after the first revelation. In fact, in each act of kindness and charity, she had a major role too. She never stopped her husband or crashed his generosity like many of us would have in favour of our own kids.

With Ali Ibn Talib, Zaid Bin Harithah, their children and two children from Khadijah’s (rta) previous marriage, the expenses weren’t few. However, never was a beggar sent empty handed, or a needy one refused from the household of Khadijah (rta). She gave up all her wealth to spread the religion of Allah (swt).

Never-ending support for her husband

Khadijah (rta) always stood alongside Muhammad (sa) firmly and supportively against the toughest of tides. It was her to whom he returned after the perturbing event of revelations and she affectionately reassured him. Khadijah (rta) was like a shelter amidst the pelting stones of harassment and mockery, a refuge after the tiring and heart breaking days of Dawah. She was not the grumpy, selfish kind. Both were like pillars supporting each other. No wonder Muhammad (sa) loved her and reminisced about her so often.

Every Muslim woman, especially the wives of Islamic workers have a lesson in this: Be a bridge between your men and their worship, not barriers. Like the pillars of a house you may be obscure. However, you are the actual source of strength and power!

He once said: “I have not yet found a better wife than her. She had faith in me when everyone, even members of my own family and tribe did not believe me, and accepted that I was truly a Prophet and a Messenger of Allah (swt). She converted to Islam, spent all her wealth and worldly goods to help me spread this faith. And this too when the entire world turned against me and persecuted me. It is through her that Allah (swt) blessed me with children.”

Every Muslim woman, especially the wives of Islamic workers have a lesson in this: Be a bridge between your men and their worship, not barriers. Like the pillars of a house you may be obscure. However, you are the actual source of strength and power!

An exemplary mother

Behind the faith of Zainab (rta), the Hijrah of Umm Kulthum (rta) and the endless courage of Fatimah (rta) was the hand of their mother. Amongst the children of Khadijah (rta), only Fatimah’s (rta) Seerah is available in detail, and in it one can see the generosity, patience, selflessness and love for Islam that she took from her mother. Khadijah (rta) is not just herself one of the top four ladies of Jannah, she’s also the mother of one of the top ladies of Jannah!

Muhammad (sa) once drew four lines on the ground and asked his companions if they knew what those meant. They replied in the negative. He then told them that they stood for the four leading ladies of Jannah: Asiyah Bint Muzahim, Mariam (as) Bint Imran (as), Khadijah (rta) Bint Khuwalid (rta) and Fatimah Bint Muhammad (rta).

This leads to a question that each one of us should ask ourselves. “Do our sons and daughters get a nourishment of faith, patience and Haya (modesty) from us?

We always rush after successful people, praising them and seeking advice from them. Why don’t we dive into the books of Seerah and spend some evenings with these fabulous Queens of Jannah. Forget about Miss Fashion, Miss World and the Miss Universe because “All that glitters is not gold!” Aspire to be amongst the women with the heart of gold: the women of Jannah and the legendary ladies; follow their footsteps in order to accomplish Jannah where they belong.

May Allah (swt) make us enter Paradise and meet the Queens of Jannah. Ameen

Teaching Techniques of Prophet Muhammad (sa) – A Workshop for Parents & Educators

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Implementing Sunnah in Today’s Classrooms (Final Part)

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26) Turn the attention of the questioner towards a more important issue.

Sometime it is better to turn the attention of the questioner to a more important issue. Once a person asked the Messenger (sa) when the Day of Judgement would come. Instead of replying, the Prophet (sa) asked him: “What have you prepared for it?” The man said that he hadn’t done much in terms of praying, fasting and charity, but he did love Allah (swt) and His Messenger (sa). The Messenger (sa) said: “You will be with whom you love.” (Bukhari)

The question that the person asked was out of genuine curiosity, but the answer was neither revealed to the Messenger (sa), nor did he consider his preparation for it. So he turned the attention of the questioner towards a more important and pressing issue, i.e., his deeds.

If the teacher doesn’t know the answer to a question, or thinks there are other more important things to be taught, s/he should not snub the student but rather divert him/her to what s/he thinks needs to be learnt first.

27) It doesn’t matter, if you are a bit inconvenienced.

A Bedouin approached the Messenger (sa), while the latter was on a journey. The person took hold of the reins of the Prophet’s (sa) camel and then said: “O Messenger of Allah! Inform me of what will draw me closer to paradise and take me away from (hell) fire.” The Prophet (sa) said: “He has certainly been blessed or guided.” The Messenger (sa) then addressed the person saying: “What did you say?” The person then repeated his question. The Messenger (sa) replied: “You should worship Allah (swt) and not ascribe any partners to Him. You should establish Salah, give Zakah and maintain good relationships with your kith and kin. You may now leave my camel.” (An-Nasai)

Note: Even if you are in a hurry, give attention to the seekers of knowledge. A little inconvenience for the teacher may result in a huge benefit for the student.

28) Don’t criticize directly.

Many a time, the Prophet (sa) would observe a person committing a wrong deed. He would immediately take action, but not necessarily point out the wrongdoer. He would stand and address the people saying that ‘some people do so and so’, so that the individual would not be embarrassed before everyone.

Not only does this method protect a student’s self-esteem, it also teaches others about the incorrect action. At the same time, it strengthens the bond between the teacher and the student.

29) Use humour.

A person asked the Prophet (sa) to give him a camel, so that he may carry his goods on it. So the Messenger (sa) said to him: “I will give you the offspring of a she-camel.” The man said: “O Messenger (sa)! What can I do with the offspring of a she-camel?” The Prophet (sa) replied: “Is it not so that camels only give birth to camels?” (Abu Dawood)

The Messenger (sa) used to joke and jest with his companions on certain occasions. However, he spoke nothing but the truth. His humor did not hurt, offend or insult anyone. The companions asked him: “O Messenger (sa)! You joke with us?” He replied: “I speak nothing but the truth.” (Bukhari)

The Prophet (sa) used to teach many things through joking and humour. In the above Hadeeth, he teaches analytical thinking and deduction, at the same time lightening the atmosphere of the assembly. A classroom tends to get stuffy at times. A light hearted joke or anecdote blows away the clouds of stiffness and perks up the atmosphere.

30) Show interest in children’s hobbies.

Abu Umayr (rtam) was a young boy who had a pet bird. The Messenger (sa) was aware of this fact. One day, the bird died. When the Prophet (sa) came to visit them, he saw that Abu Umayr was sad. So he asked: “What has happened to him?” The people of the house said: “His bird has died.” The Prophet (sa) said to him: “O Abu Umayr! What has happened to the Nughayr (small bird)?” (Abu Dawood)

This shows the Messenger’s (sa) affection and compassion for the young child, whose bird had died, leaving him heartbroken. Upon seeing the sad look on the child’s face, the Prophet (sa) immediately enquired about the matter and consoled him with words of comfort. I would like to add here that the Messenger (sa) was an exceptionally busy man, assigned the greatest and most difficult task in the history of mankind – yet, he was not too busy to inquire about the happiness of a small child. Such acts develop a strong bond between the teacher and his students, one that is pivotal in successful learning.

31) Be open to suggestions.

When the companions reached the battlefield of Badr with the Messenger (sa), he chose a certain position for pitching the tents of the army. One of the companions, Hubab bin Munzir (rtam), who was a seasoned war strategist, approached him and said: “Has this place been chosen by Allah (swt) or is it your own decision?” The Prophet (sa) replied that it wasn’t a revelation from Allah (swt); rather, he had chosen it by himself. Hubab (rtam) then requested him to consider his decision, because there was another spot at a better location for the battle. The Messenger (sa) readily accepted this proposal and changed the location of the base camp.

If the Messenger (sa) is open to suggestions at all times, the teacher too should feel happy to have students who are able to reflect and suggest ideas to him. This does not make the teacher bound to ‘obey’ a suggestion , but s/he is bound to allow students to make them.

32) Leniency in punishments.

The Messenger (sa) said: “Allah loves that one should be kind and lenient in all matters.” (Bukhari)

The Messenger (sa) himself disliked awarding a physical punishment to people and encouraged mildness in all matters. The way of the Messengers (sa) was one of love and affection. Those around him obeyed him, because they loved him and feared his disobedience, because they knew their sins upset him, not because they would be beaten.

The anger of the teacher should be feared, because it might banish someone from his/her good books, not because of corporal punishment.

Anas bin Malik (rtam) narrates: “I served the Prophet (sa) for ten years, and he never said to me, ‘Uff’ (a minor harsh word denoting impatience) and never blamed me by saying, ‘Why did you do so or why didn’t you do so?’” (Bukhari)

The Messenger (sa) did not, however, ban physical punishment. He said: “Teach the child to pray, when he is seven years old, and smack him, if he does not pray, when he is ten.”

Firstly, keep in mind that a Muslim child ought to see his parents and those around him involved in prayer from the time s/he is born. Growing up in such a household would automatically result in him/her engaging in Salah from a very young age. The Messenger (sa) has asked us to encourage a child to offer Salah regularly at the age of seven and to ensure that s/he does so by the age of ten. This means that the next three years should be spent teaching and training him. And when all this fails, then he has suggested physical punishment. There are certain things to be noted. A ten-year-old child, having spent his/her entire life watching people offer Salah, would not abstain from it. In case s/he does so, there might be some special reason behind it, which must be attended to. And before someone starts beating up their children, remember that the Messenger (sa) forbade striking anyone on the face, hitting so hard as to leave a mark on the body and beating excessively. Also, remember the purpose of physical punishment is not to injure a child but to scare him/her from an evil deed, nor should the punishment serve as a vent of frustration, when the teacher fails in his/her own duty.

A piece of advice: do not use your hands to inflict a blow; whenever your hands reach out to the child, it should always be for affection. Also remember that the fear of physical punishment should be used more often than the punishment itself. Another thing is that physical punishment does not necessarily have to be hitting, but it could also be strenuous exercise or banishment from an enjoyable task.

Adapted (with permission) from “How the Messenger of Allah (sa) Taught his Students” written by Maulvi Jahangir Mahmud (jahangir@ser.com.pk).

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Fatimah bint Muhammad

cherry-blossom-pink-flowers-3Fatimah (ra) was the fifth child of Muhammad (sa) and Khadijah (ra). She was born at a time when her noble father had begun to spend long periods in the solitude of mountains around Makkah, meditating and reflecting on the great mysteries of creation.

This was the time, before the Bi‘thah, when her eldest sister Zaynab (ra) was married to her cousin, al-’As ibn ar-Rabi’ah. Then followed the marriage of her two other sisters, Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum (ra), to the sons of Abu Lahab, a paternal uncle of the Prophet (sa). Both Abu Lahab and his wife Umm Jamil turned out to be flaming enemies of the Prophet from the very beginning of his public mission.

Little Fatimah (ra) thus saw her sisters leave home one after the other to live with their husbands. She was too young to understand the meaning of marriage and the reasons why her sisters had to leave home. She loved them dearly and was sad and lonely when they left. It is said that a certain silence and painful sadness came over her then.

Of course, even after the marriage of her sisters, she was not alone in the house of her parents. Barakah, the maid-servant of Aminah, the Prophet’s mother, who had been with the Prophet (sa) since his birth, Zayd ibn Harithah, and ‘Ali (ra), the young son of Abu Talib were all part of Muhammad’s household at this time. And of course there was her loving mother, the lady Khadijah (ra).

In her mother and in Barakah, Fatimah (ra) found a great deal of solace and comfort. In ‘Ali (ra), who was about four years older than her, she found a “brother” and a friend who somehow took the place of her own brother al-Qasim who had died in his infancy. Her other brother ‘Abdullah, known as the Good and the Pure, who was born after her, also died in his infancy. However, in none of the people in her father’s household did Fatimah (ra) find the carefree joy and happiness which she enjoyed with her sisters. She was an unusually sensitive child for her age.

When she was five, she heard that her father had become Rasul Allah, the Messenger of Allah. His first task was to convey the good news of Islam to his family and close relations. They were to worship God Almighty alone. Her mother, who was a tower of strength and support, explained to Fatimah (ra) what her father had to do. From this time on, she became more closely attached to him and felt a deep and abiding love for him. Often she would be at his side walking through the narrow streets and alleys of Makkah, visiting the Kabah or attending secret gatherings of the early Muslims who had accepted Islam and pledged allegiance to the Prophet (ra).

One day, when she was not yet ten, she accompanied her father to the Masjid al-Haram. He stood in the place known as Al-Hijr facing the Kabah and began to pray. Fatimah (ra) stood at his side. A group of Quraish, by no means well-disposed to the Prophet (sa), gathered about him. They included Abu Jahl ibn Hisham, the Prophet’s uncle. ‘Uqbah ibn Abi Mu’ayt, Umayyah ibn Khalaf and Shaybah and ‘Utbah, Sons of ar-Rabi’ah. Menacingly, the group went up to the Prophet (sa) and Abu Jahl, the ringleader asked:
“Which of you can bring the entrails of a slaughtered animal and throw it on Muhammad?”

‘Uqbah ibn Abi Mu’ayt, one of the vilest of the lot, volunteered and hurried off. He returned with the obnoxious filth and threw it on the shoulders of the Prophet, may God bless him and grant him peace, while he was still prostrating. ‘Abdullah ibn Mas’ud, a companion of the Prophet (ra), was present but he was powerless to do or say anything.

Imagine the feelings of Fatimah (ra) as she saw her father being treated in this fashion. What could she, a girl not ten years old, do? She went up to her father and removed the offensive matter and then stood firmly and angrily before the group of Qurayish thugs and lashed out against them. Not a single word did they say to her.

The noble Prophet (sa) raised his head on completion of the prostration and went on to complete the Salat. He then said: “O Lord, may you punish the Quraysh!” and repeated this imprecation three times. Then he continued: “May You punish ‘Utbah, ‘Uqbah, Abu Jahl and Shaybah.” (These whom he named all perished many years later at the Battle of Badr.)

On another occasion, Fatimah (ra) was with the Prophet (sa) as he made Tawaf around the Ka’bah. A Quraish mob gathered around him. They seized him and tried to strangle him with his own clothes. Fatimah (ra) screamed and shouted for help. Abu Bakr (ra) rushed to the scene and managed to free the Prophet (sa). While he was doing so, he pleaded:
“Would you kill a man who says. ‘Mv Lord is Allah?”

Far from giving up, the mob turned on Abu Bakr (ra) and began beating him until blood flowed from his head and face.

Such scenes of vicious opposition and harassment against her father and the early Muslims were witnessed by the young Fatimah (ra). She did not meekly stand aside but joined in the struggle in defence of her father and his noble mission. She was still a young girl and instead of the cheerful romping, the gaiety and liveliness which children of her age are and should normally was accustomed to, Fatimah (ra) had to witness and participated in such ordeals.

Of course, she was not alone in this. The whole of the Prophet’s family suffered from the mindless violence of the disbelieving Quraish. Her sisters, Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum (ra), also suffered. They were living at this time in the very nest of hatred and intrigue against the Prophet (sa). Their husbands were ‘Utbah and Utaybah, sons of Abu Lahab and Umm Jamil. Umm Jamil was known to be a hard and harsh woman who had a sharp and evil tongue. It was mainly because of her that Khadijah (ra) was not pleased with the marriages of her daughters to Umm Jamil’s sons in the first place. It must have been painful for Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum (ra) to be living in the household of such inveterate enemies who not only joined but led the campaign against their father.

As a mark of disgrace to Muhammad (sa) and his family, ‘Utbah and ‘Utaybah were prevailed upon by their parents to divorce their wives. This was part of the process of ostracizing the Prophet (sa) totally. The Prophet (sa) in fact welcomed his daughters back to his home with joy, happiness and relief.

Fatimah (ra), no doubt, must have been happy to be with her sisters once again. They all wished that their eldest sister, Zaynab (ra), would also be divorced by her husband. In fact, the Quraish brought pressure on Abu-al ‘As to do so but he refused. When the Quraish leaders came up to him and promised him the richest and most beautiful woman as a wife should he divorce Zaynab (ra), he replied:
“I love my wife deeply and passionately and I have a great and high esteem for her father even though I have not entered the religion of Islam.”

Both Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum (ra) were happy to be back with their loving parents and to be rid of the unbearable mental torture to which they had been subjected in the house of Umm Jamil. Shortly afterwards, Ruqayyah (ra) married again, to the young and shy ‘Uthman ibn ‘Affan who was among the first to have accepted Islam. They both left for Abyssinia among the first Muhajirin who sought refuge in that land and stayed there for several years. Fatimah was not to see Ruqayyah again until after their mother had died.

The persecution of the Prophet (sa), his family and his followers continued and even became worse after the migration of the first Muslims to Abyssinia. In about the seventh year of his mission, the Prophet (sa) and his family were forced to leave their homes and seek refuge in a rugged little valley enclosed by hills on all -sides and which could only be entered from Makkah by a narrow defile.

To this arid valley, Muhammad (sa) and the clans of Banu Hashim and al-Muttalib were forced to retire with limited supplies of food. Fatimah (ra) was one of the youngest members of the clans – just about twelve years old – and had to undergo months of hardship and suffering. The wailing of hungry children and women in the valley could be heard from Makkah. The Quraish allowed no food and contact with the Muslims whose hardship was only relieved somewhat during the season of pilgrimage.

The boycott lasted for three years. When it was lifted, the Prophet (sa) had to face even more trials and difficulties. Khadijah (ra), the faithful and loving, died shortly afterwards. With her death, the Prophet (sa) and his family lost one of the greatest sources of comfort and strength which had sustained them through the difficult period. The year in which the noble Khadijah (ra) and later Abu Talib died is known as the Year of Sadness. Fatimah (ra), now a young lady, was greatly distressed by her mother’s death. She wept bitterly and for some time was so grief-stricken that her health deteriorated. It was even feared she might die of grief.

Although her older sister, Umm Kulthum (ra), stayed in the same household, Fatimah (ra) realized that she now had a greater responsibility with the passing away of her mother. She felt that she had to give even greater support to her father. With loving tenderness, she devoted herself to looking after his needs. So concerned was she for his welfare that she came to be called “Umm Abi-ha” – the mother of her father”. She also provided him with solace and comfort during times of trial, difficulty and crisis.
Often the trials were too much for her. Once, about this time, an insolent mob heaped dust and earth upon his gracious head. As he entered his home, Fatimah wept profusely as she wiped the dust from her father’s head.

“Do not cry, my daughter,” he said, “for Allah shall protect your father.” The Prophet had a special love for Fatimah. He once said:

“Whoever pleased Fatimah has indeed pleased Allah and whoever has caused her to be angry has indeed angered Allah. Fatimah is a part of me. Whatever pleases her pleases me and whatever angers her angers me.”

He also said: “The best women in the entire world are four: the Virgin Mary, Asiya the wife of Pharoah, Khadijah Mother of the Believers, and Fatimah, daughter of Muhammad.” Fatimah thus acquired a place of love and esteem in the Prophet’s heart that was only occupied by his wife Khadijah.

Fatimah, may Allah be pleased with her, was given the title of “az-Zahra” which means “the Resplendent One”. That was because of her beaming face which seemed to radiate light. It is said that when she stood for Prayer, the Mihrab would reflect the light of her countenance. She was also called “al-Batul” because of her purity and asceticism. Instead of spending her time in the company of women, much of her time would be spent in Salat, in reading the Qur’an and in other acts of Ibadah.

Fatimah (ra) had a strong resemblance to her father, the Messenger of Allah. ‘A’ishah (ra), the wife of the Prophet, said of her:

“I have not seen any one of Allah’s creation resemble the Messenger of Allah more in speech, conversation and manner of sitting than Fatimah, may Allah be pleased with her. When the Prophet saw her approaching, he would welcome her, stand up and kiss her, take her by the hand and sit her down in the place where he was sitting.” She would do the same when the Prophet came to her. She would stand up and welcome him with joy and kiss him.

Fatimah’s (ra) fine manners and gentle speech were part of her lovely and endearing personality. She was especially kind to poor and indigent folk and would often give all the food she had to those in need even if she herself remained hungry. She had neither craving for the ornaments of this world nor the luxury and comforts of life. She lived simply, although on occasion as we shall see circumstances seemed to be too much and too difficult for her.

She inherited from her father a persuasive eloquence that was rooted in wisdom. When she spoke, people would often be moved to tears. She had the ability and the sincerity to stir the emotions, move people to tears and fill their hearts with praise and gratitude to Allah for His grace and His inestimable bounties.

Fatimah (ra) migrated to Madinah a few weeks after the Prophet did. She went with Zayd ibn Harithah who was sent by the Prophet back to Makkah to bring the rest of his family. The party included Fatimah and Umm Kulthum, Sawda’, the Prophet’s wife, Zayd’s wife Barakah and her son Usamah. Traveling with the group also were ‘Abdullah the son of Abu Bakr who accompanied his mother and his sisters, ‘A’ishah and Asma’ (ra).

In Madinah, Fatimah (ra) lived with her father in the simple dwelling he had built adjoining the mosque. In the second year after the Hijrah, she received proposals of marriage through her father, two of which were turned down. Then Ali (ra), the son of Abu Talib, plucked up courage and went to the Prophet (sa) to ask for her hand in marriage. In the presence of the Prophet (sa), however, Ali (ra) became over-awed and tongue-tied. He stared at the ground and could not say anything. The Prophet (sa) then asked:
“Why have you come? Do you need something?” Ali (ra) still could not speak and then the Prophet (sa) suggested: “Perhaps you have come to propose marriage to Fatimah.” “Yes.” replied Ali (ra).

At this, according to one report, the Prophet (sa) said simply: “Marhaban wa ahlan — Welcome into the family,” and this was taken by ‘Ali (ra) and a group of Ansar who were waiting outside for him as indicating the Prophet’s (sa) approval. Another report indicated that the Prophet (sa) approved and went on to ask ‘Ali (ra) if he had anything to give as Mahr. ‘Ali replied that he didn’t. The Prophet (sa) reminded him that he had a shield which could be sold.

Ali sold the shield to ‘Uthman for four hundred dirhams and as he was hurrying back to the Prophet to hand over the sum as mahr, Uthman stopped him and said: “I am returning your shield to you as a present from me on your marriage to Fatimah.”

Fatimah and Ali (ra) were thus married most probably at the beginning of the second year after the Hijrah. She was about nineteen years old at the time and ‘Ali was about twenty one. The Prophet (sa) himself performed the marriage ceremony. At the Walima, the guests were served with dates, figs and Hais (a mixture of dates and butter fat). A leading member of the Ansar donated a ram and others made offerings of grain. All of Madinah rejoiced.

On her marriage, the Prophet (sa) is said to have presented Fatimah and ‘Ali (ra) with a wooden bed intertwined with palm leaves, a velvet coverlet, a leather cushion filled with the leaves of the Idhkhir plant, a sheepskin, a pot, a waterskin and a quern for grinding grain.

Fatimah (ra) left the home of her beloved father for the first time to begin life with her husband. The Prophet (sa) was clearly anxious on her account and sent Barakah with her should she be in need of any help. And no doubt Barakah was a source of comfort and solace to her. The Prophet (sa) prayed for them: “O Lord, bless them both, bless their house and bless their offspring.”

In Ali’s (ra) humble dwelling, there was only a sheepskin for a bed. In the morning after the wedding night, the Prophet (sa) went to Ali’s (ra) house and knocked on the door. Barakah came out and the Prophet (sa) said to her: “O Umm Ayman, call my brother for me.”

“Your brother? That’s the one who married your daughter?” asked Barakah somewhat incredulously as if to say: Why should the Prophet (sa) call Ali (ra) his “brother”?
(He referred to Ali (ra) as his brother because just as pairs of Muslims were joined in brotherhood after the Hijrah, so the Prophet (sa) and Ali (ra) were linked as “brothers”.)

The Prophet (sa) repeated what he had said in a louder voice. Ali (ra) came and the Prophet (sa) made a Dua, invoking the blessings of Allah on him. Then he asked for Fatimah (ra). She came almost cringing with a mixture of awe and shyness and the Prophet (ra) said to her: “I have married you to the dearest of my family to me.” In this way, he sought to reassure her. She was not starting life with a complete stranger but with one who had grown up in the same household, who was among the first to become a Muslim at a tender age, who was known for his courage, bravery and virtue, and whom the Prophet described as his “brother in this world and the hereafter”.

Fatimah’s life with Ali (ra) was as simple and frugal as it was in her father’s household. In fact, so far as material comforts were concerned, it was a life of hardship and deprivation. Throughout their life together, Ali (ra) remained poor because he did not set great store by material wealth. Fatimah was the only one of her sisters who was not married to a wealthy man.

In fact, it could be said that Fatimah’s life with Ali (ra) was even more rigorous than life in her father’s home. At least before marriage, there were always a number of ready helping hands in the Prophet’s (sa) household. But now she had to cope virtually on her own. To relieve their extreme poverty, ‘Ali (ra) worked as a drawer and carrier of water and she as a grinder of corn. One day she said to ‘Ali (ra): “I have ground until my hands are blistered.” “I have drawn water until I have pains in my chest,” said ‘Ali (ra) and went on to suggest to Fatimah (ra): “Allah has given your father some captives of war, so go and ask him to give you a servant.” Reluctantly, she went to the Prophet (sa) who said: “What has brought you here, my little daughter?” “I came to give you greetings of peace.” she said, for in awe of him she could not bring herself to ask what she had intended. “What did you do?” asked Ali (ra) when she returned alone. “I was ashamed to ask him,” she said.

So the two of them went together but the Prophet (sa) felt they were less in need than others. “I will not give to you,” he said, “and let the Ahl as-Suffah (poor Muslims who stayed in the mosque) be tormented with hunger. I have not enough for their keep…’’ Ali and Fatimah (ra) returned home feeling somewhat dejected but that night, after they had gone to bed, they heard the voice of the Prophet (sa) asking permission to enter. Welcoming him, they both rose to their feet, but he told them: “Stay where you are,” and sat down beside them. “Shall I not tell you of something better than that which you asked of me?” he asked and when they said yes he said: “Words which Jibrael taught me, that you should say “Subhan’Allah – Glory be to Allah” ten times after every Prayer, and ten times “Alhamdulillah- Praise be to Allah.” and ten times “Allahu Akbar – Allah is Great.” And that when you go to bed you should say them thirty-three times each.”

Ali (ra) used to say in later years: ‘I have never once failed to say them since the Messenger of Allah taught them to us.”

There are many reports of the hard and difficult times which Fatimah (ra) had to face. Often there was no food in her house. Once the Prophet (sa) was hungry, he went to one after another of his wives’ apartments but there was no food. He then went to Fatimah’s (ra) house and she had no food either. When he eventually got some food, he sent two loaves and a piece of meat to Fatimah (ra). At another time, he went to the house of Abu Ayyub al-Ansari and from the food he was given, he saved some for her. Fatimah (ra) also knew that the Prophet (sa) was without food for long periods and she in turn would take food to him when she could. Once she took a piece of barley bread and he said to her:
“This is the first food your father has eaten for three days.”

Through these acts of kindness she showed how much she loved her father; and he loved her, really loved her in return.

Once he returned from a journey outside Madinah. He sent to the mosque first of all and prayed two Rakats as was his custom. Then, as he often did, he went to Fatimah’s (ra) house before going to his wives. Fatimah (ra) welcomed him and kissed his face, his mouth and his eyes and cried. “Why do you cry’?” the Prophet (sa) asked. “I see you, O Rasul Allah.” she said. “Your color is pale and sallow and your clothes have become worn and shabby.”

“O Fatimah,” the Prophet (sa) replied tenderly. “Don’t cry for Allah has sent your father with a mission which He would cause to affect every house on the face of the earth whether it be in towns, villages or tents (in the desert) bringing either glory or humiliation until this mission is fulfilled just as night (inevitably) comes.” With such comments Fatimah (ra) was often taken from the harsh realities of daily life to get a glimpse of the vast and far-reaching vistas opened up by the mission entrusted to her noble father.

Fatimah (ra) eventually returned to live in a house close to that of the Prophet (sa). The place was donated by an Ansari who knew that the Prophet (sa) would rejoice in having his daughter as his neighbour. Together they shared in the joys and the triumphs, the sorrows and the hardships of the crowded and momentous Madinah days and years.

In the middle of the second year after the Hijrah, her sister Ruqayyah (ra) fell ill with fever and measles. This was shortly before the great campaign of Badr. Uthman (ra), her husband, stayed by her bedside and missed the campaign. Ruqayyah (ra) died just before her father returned. On his return to Madinah, one of the first acts of the Prophet (sa) was to visit her grave.

Fatimah (ra) went with him. This was the first bereavement they had suffered within their closest family since the death of Khadijah (ra). Fatimah (ra) was greatly distressed by the loss of her sister. The tears poured from her eyes as she sat beside her father at the edge of the grave, and he comforted her and sought to dry her tears with the corner of his cloak.

The Prophet (sa) had previously spoken against lamentations for the dead, but this had led to a misunderstanding and when they returned from the cemetery the voice of ‘Umar (ra) was heard rose in anger against the women who were weeping for the martyrs of Badr and for Ruqayyah (ra).

“‘Umar, let them weep.” he said and then added: “What comes from the heart and from the eye, which is from Allah and His mercy, but what comes from the hand and from the tongue which is from Satan.” By the hand he meant the beating of breasts and the smiting of cheeks, and by the tongue he meant the loud clamour in which women often joined as a mark of public sympathy.

Uthman (ra) later married the other daughter of the Prophet (sa). Umm Kulthum (ra) and on this account came to be known as Dhu-n Nurayn – Possessor of the Two Lights.

The bereavement which the family suffered by the death of Ruqayyah (ra) was followed by happiness when, to the great joy of all the believers. Fatimah (ra) gave birth to a boy in Ramadan of the third year after the Hijrah. The Prophet (sa) spoke the words of the Adhan into the ear of the newborn babe and called him al—Hasan which means the Beautiful One.

One year later, she gave birth to another son who was called al-Husayn, which means “little Hasan” or the little beautiful one.

Fatimah (ra) would often bring her two sons to see their grandfather who was exceedingly fond of them. Later he would take them to the Mosque and they would climb unto his back when he prostrated. He did the same with his little granddaughter Uma’mah, the daughter of Zaynab (ra).

In the eighth year after the Hijrah, Fatimah (ra) gave birth to a third child, a girl whom she named after her eldest sister Zaynab (ra) who had died shortly before her birth. This Zaynab was to grow up and become famous as the “Heroine of Karbala”. Fatimah’s (ra) fourth child was born two years later. The child was also a girl and the Prophet (sa) chose for her the name Umm Kulthum after Fatimah’s (ra) sister who had died the year before after an illness.

It was only through Fatimah (ra) that the progeny of the Prophet (sa) was perpetuated. All the Prophet’s (sa) male children had died in their infancy and the two children of Zaynab (ra), named Ali and Umamah, died young. Ruqayyah’s (ra) child, ‘Abdullah, also died when he was not yet two years old. This is an added reason for the reverence which is accorded to Fatimah (ra).

Although Fatimah (ra) was so often busy with pregnancies and giving birth and rearing children, she took as much part as she could in the affairs of the growing Muslim community of Madinah. Before her marriage, she acted as a sort of hostess to the poor and destitute Ahl as Suffah. As soon as the Battle of Uhud was over, she went with other women to the battlefield and wept over the dead martyrs and took time to dress her father’s wounds. At the Battle of the Trench, she played a major supportive role together with other women in preparing food during the long and difficult siege. In the place of her camp there stands a mosque named Masjid Fatimah, one of seven mosques where the Muslims stood guard and performed their devotions.

Fatimah (ra) also accompanied the Prophet when he made Umrah in the sixth year after the Hijrah after the Treaty of Hudaybiyah. In the following year, she and her sister Umm Kulthum (ra), were among the mighty throng of Muslims who took part with the Prophet (sa) in the liberation of Makkah. It is said that on this occasion, both Fatimah and Umm Kulthum visited the home and the grave of their mother Khadijah (ra) and recalled memories of their childhood and memories of Jihad, of long struggles in the early years of the Prophet’s (sa) mission.

In Ramadan of the tenth year just before he went on his Farewell Pilgrimage, the Prophet (sa) confided to Fatimah (ra), as a secret not yet to be told to others;
“Jibrael recited the Qur’an to me and I to him once every year, but this year he has recited it with me twice. I cannot but think that my time has come.”

On his return from the Farewell Pilgrimage, the Prophet (sa) did become seriously ill. His final days were spent in the apartment of his wife ‘A’ishah (ra). When Fatimah (ra) came to visit him, ‘A’ishah (ra) would leave father and daughter together.

One day he summoned Fatimah (ra). When she came, he kissed her and whispered some words in her ear. She wept – Then again he whispered in her ear and he smiled. ‘A’ishah (ra) saw and aked:
“You cry and you laugh at the same time, Fatimah? What did the Messenger of Allah say to you?” Fatimah replied: “He first told me, that he would meet his Lord after a short while and so I cried. Then he said to me: Don’t cry for you will be the first of my household to join me.’ So I laughed.” He also said to her then: “Aren’t you pleased that you are the First Lady (Sayyidatu-n Nisa’) of this Ummah?”

Not long afterwards the noble Prophet (sa) passed away. Fatimah (ra) was grief-stricken and she would often be seen weeping profusely. One of the companions noted that he did not see Fatimah (ra), may Allah be pleased with her, laugh after the death of her father.

One morning, early in the month of Ramadan, just less than five months after her noble father had passed away; Fatimah (ra) woke up looking unusually happy and full of mirth. In the afternoon of that day, it is said that she called Salma bint Umays who was looking after her. She asked for some water and had a bath. She then put on new clothes and perfumed herself. She then asked Salma to put her bed in the courtyard of the house. With her face looking to the heavens above, she asked for her husband Ali (ra).
He was taken aback when he saw her lying in the middle of the courtyard and asked her what was wrong. She smiled and said: “I have an appointment today with the Messenger of Allaah.”

Ali (ra) cried and she tried to console him. She told him to look after their sons al-Hasan and al-Husavn and advised that she should be buried without ceremony. She then turned and faced the Qiblah, closed her eyes, and slept. It was a sleep from which she did not awake.

She, Fatimah (ra) the Resplendent One, was just 29 years old.

[Infograph] 7 Things Your Muslim Wife Won’t Tell You

Brother Wajih Ahmed wrote an inspiring article titled “7 Things Your Muslim Wife Won’t Tell You” posted originally on the Daily Reminders‘ website.

Passant Muhammad designed an infograph based on this article for Islamographic.

Here, we are posting this infograph with their permission

Women

Implementing Sunnah in Today’s Classrooms – Part 3

13) Teach what is easily acceptable

Ali ibn Abi Talib (rtam) said: “Narrate to the people what they are acquainted with. Would you like Allah (swt) and His Messenger (sa) to be rejected?” (Bukhari)

Educators should remember that if they overload the students, this might result in a complete breakdown. If a student collapses intellectually once, it takes a mountain of effort to bring him/her back on track.

In terms of teaching Islamic obligations, one step at a time should be taken, in order to make the new entrant in this field comfortable. For example, let younger children begin their Salah with Fard only. Later, when they get into the routine, ask them to attempt a few Sunnah units as well. This way, they will not feel over-burdened. Sports’ coaches face similar situations. For instance, weights are increased progressively to make the athlete accept the challenge easily.

14) First the easy and then the difficult

When the Prophet (sa) sent Muadh ibn Jabal (rtam) to Yemen, he said to him: “You are going to the people of the Scripture. Let the first thing to which you will invite them be the Tauhid of Allah (swt). If they learn that, tell them that Allah (swt) has enjoined on them five prayers to be offered in one day and one night. If they pray, tell them that Allah (swt) has enjoined on them Zakah of their properties and it is to be taken from the rich among them and given to the poor. If they agree to that, then take from them the Zakah but avoid the best property of the people.” (Bukhari)

Thus, Allah’s Messenger (sa) taught Muadh (rtam) the order, in which to teach the people of Yemen, so that they would not suddenly feel overburdened with the injunctions. This step-by-step approach must be adopted in today’s classrooms, so that the students easily grasp concepts, as they grow intellectually.

15) Make matters easy for the students

Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “Allah has not sent me as a person, who causes difficulty to others. Rather, He sent me as a teacher, who gives glad tidings.” (Muslim)

According to Allah’s Messenger (sa), the primary function of the teacher is to make matters easy for students to understand, that is, simplify and dilute the lessons for their wards. The level of lesson must be brought down to match the mental abilities of the students. A teacher can impress his or her students with fancy words, but if he or she fails to make them comprehend the lesson, then the purpose is lost. Educators should ensure their students understand the lesson.

16) Break down into easier goals

Abdullah ibn Masud (rtam) said: “When any of us (companions) learnt ten verses, he would not go any further, until he had learnt their meaning and how to put it into practice.” (Kashf al-Qina) This is the perfect example of Allah’s Messenger’s (sa) teaching methodology. Breaking down a larger task into smaller units can help students achieve the easier goals. These can finally culminate to become important milestones for the students.

17) Interactive teaching

Abdullah bin Amr (rtam) said he heard Allah’s Messenger (sa) asking his companions: “Do you know who is a Muslim?” They replied: “Allah and His Messenger know best.” Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “A Muslim is he from whose tongue and hands other Muslims are safe.” (Ahmad)

Interactive teaching is one of the most prominent characteristics of the Messenger’s (sa) teaching methodology. By asking questions, he stimulated the intellect of the students, and they then became more eager to absorb the knowledge. This method is especially beneficial, when a lesson becomes somewhat dull, and a question (on any related subject) becomes a wake-up call for those present.

18) Teaching by demonstration

A person came to Allah’s Messenger (sa) and said: “O Allah’s Messenger! How should I perform ablution?” Allah’s Messenger (sa) asked for water in a container and demonstrated the complete act of ablution for him. (Abu Dawood) When teaching, the best way to make students remember and understand is to show them by performing the act yourself.

19) Similes and examples

Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “The example of a good companion and a bad companion is like that of the seller of musk and the one, who blows the blacksmith’s bellows. As for the seller of musk, then either he will grant you some, you will buy some from him or at least you will enjoy a pleasant smell from him. As for the one, who blows the blacksmith’s bellows, then either he will burn your clothes or you will get an offensive smell from him.” (Bukhari and Muslim)

Here, Allah’s Messenger (sa) has used a simile to explain the difference between good and bad company. Likewise, he would frequently use parables and similes to make the students understand the points he wanted to make. An important lesson here is that the teacher should not just issue orders; he or she should explain the wisdom behind them as well.

20) Storytelling

One of the favourite methods of Allah’s Messenger (sa) was true storytelling. The Quran, the Ahadeeth and other Islamic books are full of historical events and inspiring narratives, which can be used to impart knowledge and values to the students. Regardless of which subject you teach, you can always narrate an interesting anecdote, when the class becomes boring during a long discourse.

21) Use body language

Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “Should I not inform you about the most serious of major sins?” He said this thrice. At that time, he was leaning against something. Then he sat up and said: “Behold! A false statement and a false testimony! Behold! A false statement and a false testimony!” (Muslim)

The repetitive style of the Messenger (sa) is used here to emphasize the importance of the subject coming up. Note that to utter the last statement, he sat up. A teacher’s body language is very important to his delivery. A sudden change in posture can make the students more attentive in class.

22) Illustrate with hand gestures

Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “A believer to another believer is like a wall – one part strengthens the other.” Allah’s Messenger (sa) then interlocked his fingers. (Bukhari) In the absence of audio-visual aids, even a simple act of using one’s hand or body can help students understand an important topic.

23) Exhibit items

Allah’s Messenger (sa) took a piece of silk in his left hand and some gold in his right hand. He raised them with his hands and said: “These two items are prohibited to the males of my Ummah.”

Announcing the prohibition might have been enough, but the Messenger (sa) deliberately chose to exhibit samples of the items being discussed. This emphasizes the importance of visual images in teaching. Educators using these on a regular basis will experience a higher level of learning from their students, Insha’Allah!

24) Let students take notes

Abdullah ibn Amr ibn al-Aas (rtam) said: “I used to write down everything, which I used to hear from Allah’s Messenger (sa).” (Abu Dawood) Bear in mind that some students are slow in writing. Be patient with them, so that they may record your knowledge.

25) Encourage students to ask questions

The Quran instructs: “…So ask of those who know the scripture [learned men of the Taurat (Torah) and the Injeel (Gospel)], if you know not.” (An-Nahl 16:43) A teacher must be willing to answer his students’ queries. Allah’s Messenger (sa) encouraged the people to put forward their enquiries. He said: “The cure for ignorance is questioning.” (Ad-Daraqutni)

When dealing with queries, answer calmly and maintain your composure. Use logic and rationale when responding to questions. Your attitude should encourage students to ask for further explanation, if needed.

Adapted (with permission) from “How the Messenger of Allah (sa) Taught his Students” written by Maulvi Jahangir Mahmud (jahangir@ser.com.pk).

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