My Dad – My ATM


Behaviour is not a production of any moment. Behaviour surfaces on the basis of maybe the past ten years of someone’s life. It has a long-term history. It is based on the state as well as the strength of emotions. Particularly, when children are young, they need their parents’ support for emotional strengthening.  In today’s overly distracting world, parents are likely to be oblivious of children’s emotional needs and reduce their role to managing logistics.

In the prevailing culture, relationships are in danger. Tragically, in many families, for the kids their parents don’t matter. Fathers have become ATM machines for their children. The kids approach their dads when they are in need of finances or logistic support. Alarmingly, in many households, even wives talk to husbands for the same reasons, as usually they are not around. This was proven in a survey I conducted among fathers asking them for what reason were they approached by their families the last four times during one month. The reason was money. They had nothing else to share between them.

My Dad is not my Confidante

Religious families have a bigger crisis on the roll. They do not enjoy many forms of entertainments that are naturally impermissible for them. Hence, they refrain from it. But parallel to this, what they fail to do is raise their children with appropriate Tarbiyah (upbringing). By the term Tarbiyah, I refer to a process of purifying one’s desires to ultimately seek the Creator’s pleasure. It is a life-long training that enables you to want what God wants from you.

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Murabaha: An Islamic Sale

Vol 1-Issue 2   Islamic FinanceDifferent types of Sales in Islam

Sales are divided into two categories with respect to cost and price:

1. Bargaining Sale (Musawamah): where the buyer and the seller agree on the selling price without taking into consideration the cost of the merchandise.

2. Trust sales: where the buyer and the seller agree on the price of the merchandise, taking into account its original cost. This type of sale is further subdivided into three types:

a. Murabaha: where the price of the merchandise includes an amount greater than the original cost.

b. Tawliyah: where the price of the merchandise is equal to its cost (i.e., with no profit, nor loss).

c. Wadhee’ah: where the price of the merchandise is less than its cost (i.e., a loss).

Necessary conditions for the validity of the Murabaha sale

1. The buyer should know the cost of the merchandise. If he feels that there has been any deception in setting the price, he has a choice to revoke the sale.

2. The profit should also be known

3. The price and merchandise should not be of the same type (or commodity), otherwise it becomes Riba (Riba Al Hadith, in particular). For instance, if gold is traded with gold, with a difference in the amount it would be riba, and therefore not allowed.

How Murabaha is carried out today

A person wants to buy merchandise but cannot pay its price in cash. He asks the Islamic bank to buy it for him and pay its price in full. Thereafter, the bank buys the merchandise or imports it from the local market and sells it to that person in installments, with a fixed profit that is agreed upon in advance.

Answers to some objections

Skeptics argue that the Murabaha contract involves the sale of the merchandise that is not in the possession of the seller. However, one of the conditions of the Murabaha sale is to ratify the contract only after the bank is in possession of the merchandise. Therefore, this allegation becomes baseless. Another objection raised is that it is a type of loan sale, and a way to circumvent Riba. Once again, this is a false claim because the selling and the buying occur effectively.

Yet another objection raised is that there are two sales in one, which has been forbidden by the Holy Prophet (sa). However, a closer look at the transaction shows that this is not the case. In a Murabaha transaction, the person does not say, “buy this merchandise from me and I will buy it from you at a higher price.” The deal is about a merchandise that the client wants to acquire by buying it in installments from the bank, whom he has asked to purchase from the merchant.

Opponents of Murabaha argue that the promise to buy in a Murabaha contract constitutes an obligation that was not enjoined by the Shariah. However, it is to be noted that the mutual promise between the bank and the client, that includes the promise of the client to buy, and a promise from the bank to execute the sale once it is in possession of the merchandise, is simply a promise and not an obligation. Many Quranic verses and many Ahadeeth have encouraged the fulfillment of promises.

(Adapted from “Selling at a Profit: Murabahah”; Al Jumuah, Vol 12, Issue 11)

Musharakah: Sharing Profits and Losses

Vol 1-Issue 2   Islamic FinanceWhat is Musharakah?

Musharakah means ‘sharing.’ The root of the word is Shirkah, which means ‘being a partner.’ Under Islamic law, Musharakah is a joint enterprise, formed for conducting business, in which all partners share the profit according to a specified ratio, while the loss is shared according to the ratio of the contribution.

Differences Between Interest-Based Financing and Musharakah

1. In interest-based financing, the financer predetermines a fixed rate of return on a loan, irrespective of the profit earned or loss suffered by the debtor. In Musharakah, the return is based on the actual profit earned by the joint venture.

2. If a Musharakah joint venture fails, the financier also suffers a loss. In a system based on interest, the financier secures himself against such an eventuality by fixing a rate of interest.

Basic Rules

Musharakah or Shirkat-ul-amwal is a relationship established by the parties through a mutual contract. Therefore, all the necessary ingredients of a valid contract must be present. For example, the parties should be capable of entering into a contract; the contract must take place with the free consent of the parties, without any duress, fraud, or misrepresentation. However, there are certain rules specifically related to a Musharakah contract.

Rules of Capital

The capital in a Musharakah agreement should be:

  • quantified (Ma’loom),
  • qsecified (Muta’aiyan),
  • not necessarily merged,
  • not necessarily in liquid form.


Every partner has the right to manage the business as well as to work for it. However, the partners may agree upon a condition that the management would be carried out by one of them, and no other partner would work for the Musharakah. In such case, the ‘sleeping partner’ would be entitled to the profit only to the extent of his investment – the ratio of his profit would not exceed the ratio of his investment. However, if all partners agree to work for the joint venture, each one of them would be treated as the agent of the other in all matters of business.

Rules Regarding the Distribution of Profit and Loss

1. Profit:

  • The profit ratio of each partner must be determined proportionally to the actual profit of the business and not in proportion to the capital invested by him.
  • It is prohibited to set a fixed amount for any partner or attach any specific rate of profit to his investment.
  • It is allowed for both partners to agree on profit percentage according to their investment, no matter if both of them work or not.
  • If an investor is working, his profit share can be more than his capital investment, no matter if the other partner is working or not.

2. Loss:

  • Loss is distributed exactly according to the ratio of investment.

Termination of Musharakah

A Musharakah will stand terminated in the following cases:

1.  If the purpose of forming the business has been achieved. For example, if two persons had formed a partnership for a certain project, e.g., buying a specific quantity of cars in order to sell them, and the cars are purchased and sold with mutual investment, then the contract stands terminated.

2.  Every partner has the right to terminate the Musharakah at any time, after giving his partner a notice that will cause the Musharakah to end.

3.  In case of a death of any one of the partners or any partner becoming insane or incapable of carrying out commercial transactions, the Musharakah stands terminated.

Termination of Musharakah Without Closing the Business

If one of the partners wants termination of the Musharakah, while the other partner would like to continue with the business, a mutual agreement should take place. The partner interested in the business may purchase the share of the partner wishing to terminate his partnership.

(Courtesy: Meezan Bank’s Guide to Islamic Finance)

Summer Fun For Everyone

Fun can mean different things to different people, and it differs across the globe.  Naba Basar shares delightful ways to have family fun this summer.

Many people think of ‘fun’ only in terms of Haram things or behaviours. It certainly does not have to be this way. Allah has made clear to us what is allowed and what is forbidden. In the following Ayah, He warns us:

“O you who believe! Make not unlawful the Taiyibat (all that is good as regards foods, things, deeds, beliefs, persons, etc.) that which Allah has made lawful to you, and transgress not. Verily, Allah does not like transgressors” (Al-Maidah 5:87).


Indoor Games

When was the last time you played “Pictionary,” “Scrabble,” or “Checkers” together as a family? You may be surprised, how parents transform into kids, when they celebrate victories over their children.

On the Road

There are always interesting places we have never seen and yet others that we hold in special memories and would like to return to. A trip for performing Umra can become a great vacation. Field trips to farms and factories are not only fun but also educational.


Summer is a superb time for camping, both with family and friends. While pitching tents, building fires, fishing, boating, or hiking, nobody will find the time to get bored.


Get on the ball and keep track of all the conventions and workshops. There are many to choose from. Select a few with the most interesting themes and plan ahead for attending them. Conventions are great for meeting new friends.


Encourage imagination of your children by reading books to them. Check with your local library and sign up your kids for a summer reading program. During summer, most bookstores have sales, where you can buy books on cheaper rates. Your local library can also provide ideas for summertime activities within the city.



Dust off the bikes in the garage and find a path in a park. Organize competitions, hold races, or time the laps.


An exciting and interesting way for teens to have fun. This activity works great for both small and large groups.

Cooking Dishes of Native Cuisines

An innovative way to learn about different parts of the world. Search for recipes online, in your local library, or at bookstores.

E-pals from Muslim Countries

In chat rooms, teens can find good Muslim e-pals. By making friendships all around the world, your children will expand their worldview and learn new languages. However, this activity does require the supervision of parents.

Community service

Volunteer your time and services to help out others in need and support. It is a great learning opportunity, which will strengthen the Deen of your children.


Backyard Campouts

Let your children invite over their friends; grab a tent, some sleeping bags, and flashlights. Do not forget mosquito repellents!


You can prepare homemade finger-paints by mixing together soap flakes, water, and food colours.

Pet Detective

Teach your children to observe an animal or an insect for a day. Discuss with them the observations.

Islamic Timeline

Record the discoveries of Muslim scientists. This is an educational yet interesting project.


Always a fun place to go to for seeing Allah’s creatures.

Museums and Art Galleries

Visits to museums and art galleries will allow your children to explore different cultures and to develop a taste for art.

Parks and Beaches

Take advantage of your local parks, playgrounds, beaches, and lakes. You can have picnics every week or every month.

The Creator and Our Kids

Image creator and kidsLove and recognition of Allah (swt) is not a cap that can be picked up from any store and worn on our heads. It needs to be grown gradually with care, wisdom and knowledge. It starts with the inception of life and not after one turns fifty, and heads towards the prayer mat. What our kids need is the right start in the right direction. Here is how we can achieve this goal:

Pre-birth relations

Allah (swt) breathes a soul into the unborn child in the fourth month of its conception in the mother’s womb. Allah (swt) states: “It is He Who fashioned you in the wombs as He pleases. There is no deity except Him, the All-Mighty, the All-Wise.” (Al-Imran 3:6)

By the seventh month the foetus is able to respond to stimuli including pain, light and sound. By the end of the eighth month, it has undergone tremendous brain development and is now capable of seeing and hearing.

Besides nurturing a bond with her unborn child the mother may help her child develop ties with its Creator too.

The mother can recite the Quran aloud, or play an audiotape. This will provide solace to her, and also familiarize her baby with the Divine Revelation.

Much of the anxiety of a pregnant woman departs by praying to Allah (swt) for her own, and her unborn child’s health and safety.

The parents can give their child a head start by indulging themselves in simple good deeds.

Most significantly, the parents will have prepared a home environment, to welcome the baby, where everyone thinks and talks about Allah (swt).

Relations at birth:

Once the baby is born, as parents, we must thank Allah (swt) for the blessing bestowed upon us. The child is now admitted as the newest member of the Muslim Ummah by following Prophet Muhammad’s (sa) Sunnah, which is not obligatory but comes highly recommended. This includes the following rituals:

Adhan should be called out in the newborn’s ear. The Prophet Muhammad (saw) said: “If one has a baby and makes the Adhan in its right ear and the Iqamah in its left ear, Satan will not disturb the child, Allah willing.” (Bayhaqi)

Tahneek refers to softening a date by any ordinary means and rubbing a small amount in the baby’s mouth.

Tasmiyah means naming a child. The Prophet (sa) said: “On the Day of Resurrection, you will be called by your names and by your father’s names, so give yourself good names.” (Abu Dawood)

Aqeeqah means to slaughter a sheep or other animal to celebrate birth of a child.

Relations in the first two years

A man came to Malik Ibn Nabiy asking for advice about his daughter’s education. Malik asked him: “How old is she?” The man replied: “One month.” Malik said: “You missed the train.” This statement may seem an exaggeration, but a child’s learning starts from the time it comes to this world. Our baby swiftly learns to cry for attention, food, a nappy change, and more. Parents can do much during these formative years:

The parents can continue reading the Quran, or playing an audiotape of it for the baby at least once or twice a day.

Parents become very upset when their child disturbs their prayer. The Prophet (sa) use to offer his prayers even while carrying his grandchildren in his arms.

Parents can set out a separate prayer mat and allow the kid to imitate them in prayers, as children love to emulate grownups.

Whenever the toddler does something deserving praise, he should always be told how Allah (swt) must be happy with him and will reward him, Insha’Allah.

As parents, we should not invoke fear of the Creator into children’s hearts by telling them how they will be punished for bad behaviour. The Prophet (sa) said: “There are three (kinds of people) whose actions are not recorded: a sleeper until he awakens, a boy (referring to children) until he reaches puberty, and a lunatic until he comes to reason.” (Abu Dawood)

Relations in the first five years

Abu Hurairah (rta) narrated that Allah’s Messenger (sa) said: “No child is born except on the Fitrah (of connectedness to Allah (swt)), as the animal gives birth to a perfect offspring. Do you find it mutilated? Then his parents Judaize or Christianize or Magianize him.” (Bukhari)

Norma Tarazi a writer, explains: “Being born in Fitrah does not mean being perfect. Our Fitrah prepares us to receive the guidance of Allah (swt) and to search for it, but we need that knowledge from outside ourselves in order to live in the best way.” The provider of this knowledge is the parent. Ibn Al-Qayyim rightly observes: “If you consider the causes of bad behaviour in children, you will, in general, find that the parents are the main cause.” Parents can play a positive role by following these steps:

It is best to teach children the Quran at an early age, since their minds are razor sharp and can pick new things easily and steadily.

Kids love bedtime stories, so this is an opportunity to narrate real life accounts of our prophets and their companions.

Parents can teach kids short Duas for different occasions, which help the child remember Allah (swt) at frequent intervals like, before eating, sleeping etc

We can inculcate gratitude in the child by helping him understand how the good food, toys, games, love, and everything in life comes from Allah (swt).

Whenever the child errs, parents may explain to him that he can mend ways by sincerely repenting to Allah (swt), and resolving to do better next time.

Relations in the first ten years

The companions of the Prophet (sa) took this great duty of child education at heart. They harshly reprimanded those who gave more attention to the grownups than to the children. Amr Ibn Al-As (rta) saw a group of men sitting next to the Kabah. They ordered the children to keep away from their gathering. He told them: “Do not do that! Let them join you and be near you, and give them guidance. They may be young today, but they will be adults tomorrow.” Parents can gear their kids’ energies in the right direction by doing much:

Once the kid is mature, we can explain him the purpose of our existence. Our mission to do good and stay away from evil. Once we return to Allah (swt), we will be judged for our deeds and accordingly rewarded for them.

We must teach the meaning of the Quran in any language of preference. We can only expect our kids to benefit from this knowledge if they are able to understand it and not by having just read it like a parrot.

The parents can invite their children to observe the wonderful creations of Allah (swt) and how the Quran defined them hundreds of years ago even before they were discovered scientifically.

As parents we must build our child’s trust in the Creator (swt). The kid must believe that it is Allah (swt) who can help him in any situation; He is watching him, and listening to him everywhere.

Assessing the prevalent scenario around us, Mounir Ibrahim a prolific writer comments: “Our children are indeed the future trustees of the Muslim Ummah. The importance of education should be even more emphasized in these times when falsehood is so widespread. If the parents do not rescue their children with a strong Islamic education, the children will melt in the pot and may join the ranks of those who wage war against Allah (swt) and the believers.”