Down but not out!

Jul 10 - The Prophet's saw concern for taharah

There have been many, many companions of the Prophet (sa), who were considered to be among the less privileged in terms of financial matters. However, in terms of morals and manners, they were the elite. One of them was Umair ibn Sad (rtam). He grew up in the household of Julas ibn Suwayd (rtam), his mother’s second husband. Julas (rtam) gave him an excellent upbringing.

During the Battle of Tabook, Umair (rtam) saw the large amount of booty, along with a bag of one thousand Dinars that Usman ibn Affan (rtam) handed over to the Prophet (sa). Although he was in great financial need at the time, he did not utter a single word of request to the Prophet (sa). And this is how he was. He was among the three companions of the Prophet (sa) known to be Zahid (practicing Zuhd), along with Abu Ad-Darda (rtam) and Shaddad ibn Aws (rtam).

During the Caliphate of Umar ibn Al-Khattab (rtam), Umair (rtam) was appointed as the governor of Homs. When he walked towards Madinah from Homs to meet the Caliph, Umar (rtam) asked: “Didn’t any of the Muslims offer you a ride?”

He replied: “They neither offered it, nor I requested it.”

Umar (rtam) responded: “How indifferent have the Muslims become!”

Umair (rtam) admonished him: “O Ameer-ul-Mumineen! Allah (swt) has forbidden backbiting.”

When Umar (rtam) later asked him about the distribution of war booty and collection of Jizyah, he replied: “I have spent all the wealth, wherever it is most needed.”

Later, when Umar (rtam) sent to him one hundred Dinars through a messenger, Umair (rtam) summoned the children of those who had been martyred in different battles, and distributed the entire amount among them. He did not keep a single Dinar for himself, though he did need money at the time.

Indeed, this companion’s life is a role model for all of us in these materialistic times!

Adapted (with permission) from “Sunehray Huroof” published by Darussalam. Translated and compiled for “Hiba” by Umm Ibrahim.

Generosity wins!


Muslim ibn Sabeeh Koofi narrated the following incident from his father:

A handsome, young Arab (whose name is unknown) and Mugheerah ibn Shubah (rtam), a companion of Prophet Muhammad (sa), sent a proposal of marriage almost simultaneously to a woman. She gave a similar reply to both of them: “You have proposed to me, but I cannot answer any of you, unless I meet you and talk to you. If you really want to marry me, come to me at such-and-such time so that I can reach a conclusion.”

Both men arrived at the stipulated time. The lady requested them to take a seat in a place from where she could observe them and hear their conversation. They had no idea, however, that she was over-hearing them.

Mugheerah (rtam) felt rather envious of the young man, who was obviously well-groomed, attractive and eloquent. He was beginning to realize that he didn’t stand a chance against such a formidable candidate, as the lady would obviously prefer the young man as her husband. He asked him: “You are quite good-looking and well-spoken. Do you have any other positive qualities?” The young man brightened up and replied proudly: “Yes, I possess such-and-such qualities, too…”

He went on praising himself and his personality for a while. Then, there was silence. Mugheerah (rtam) asked him: “How responsible and accountable are you in (personal) financial matters?”

He answered: “I am very, very particular about finances. I track each and every penny meticulously.”

“I do things a little differently,” explained Mugheerah (rtam). “I keep a certain amount of money in a designated place in my house. My family members are free to spend from it as they like. I don’t expect them to account for their expenses incurred using that money. I find out they need more only when that amount has finished.”

The lady was listening closely to the conversation. When she heard Mugheerah’s (rtam) way of handling his finances, she declared: “By Allah! I think this man deserves the most to be my husband! I don’t want to marry the young Arab who, I am sure, is going to be after me to account for every single penny that I spend.”

The woman then married Mugheerah ibn Shubah (rtam).

Adapted (with permission) from “Sunehri Kirnain” published by “Darussalam”. Translated and compiled for “Hiba” by Umm Ibrahim.

Eid and a Mother’s Woes


By Abdul-Malik Mujahid – General Manager, Darussalam Publishers and Distributors

The following incident has been related by Shaykh Abdul-Khaliq Al-Qarni, who is a famous Daee (caller to Islam) in Saudi Arabia. He says this incident was narrated to him by a jeweller:

A few days before Eid, a man entered my shop along with his wife, his mother and his child. His elderly mother, who was carrying the child, went to stand in a corner of the shop. The couple started browsing the different jewels and finally chose jewellery sets worth twenty thousand Riyals. In the meantime, the mother was also attracted to the priceless gems. She went over to the display of gold rings, where she found one she liked and placed it on her finger. That ring was priced at a hundred Riyals.

According to the jeweller, when the son went over to the counter to pay the bill, he handed twenty thousand Riyals to him. The jeweller requested him for another hundred Riyals. “For what?” The son asked. “We just agreed upon this price.”

“The extra hundred is for the ring that your mother has purchased,” replied the jeweller.

The son pulled a face: “Really! What use do old women have for gold?” He went over to his mother and asked her where the ring was. Realizing that she was wearing it, he wrenched it from her hand, placed it back on the counter, picked up his purse, and started to walk out of the shop. The jeweller was stunned.

The mother tried very hard not to show her emotions publically. She silently picked up her grandson and followed the son out of the shop. Once they had reached the car, the jeweller heard the son’s wife burst out in anger at her husband. “Why did you take the ring away from your mother? Why did you not let her have it? You broke her heart with this attitude. Now, if she leaves the house, who will take care of our son? Who will wash his feeder?”

Upon hearing this, the son re-entered the shop and asked the jeweller to give him back the ring that he had previously thrown onto the counter. The jeweller complied and handed it to him. He paid for it and came back outside. However, when he presented the ring to his mother, she replied, “By Allah, I will never wear gold again. I only wanted this ring to wear on Eid day. I wanted to celebrate Eid with other people. Now, I have no wish to join in the Eid celebrations. May Allah forgive you, my son!”

Adapted (with permission) from Waldain published by Darussalam. Translated and compiled for Hiba by Umm Ibrahim.

The Slave’s False Claim


Once, a man came to Caliph Mansoor. He complained about another man who, he alleged, was hoarding wealth and weapons for Banu Ummayah.

The Caliph ordered his chief of police to set out and arrest the offender. The police did as told, and soon, the offender was standing before the Caliph.

“We have been informed that you are hoarding wealth and weapons, entrusted to you by Banu Ummayah. We order you to present all the wealth and weapons before us, and turn them over to the state treasury.”

The man calmly asked the Caliph: “Ameer Al-Mumineen! Are you one of the inheritors of Banu Ummayah?”

The Caliph replied in the negative.

The man inquired: “Have Banu Ummayah left a will, saying that you should inherit their wealth and weapons?”

Again, the Caliph answered no.

“Then why are you asking me about their wealth and weapons?” the man queried.

Caliph Mansoor bowed his head. Finally, he said: “Look, Banu Ummayah committed many atrocities against the people and usurped their wealth unlawfully. I only want this wealth, which was confiscated illegally in the first place, to be handed over to the state treasury.”

“Ameer Al-Mumineen!” The man explained. “You need more solid evidence to prove in the court of law that the wealth and weapons, which have been entrusted to me, are indeed the same ones which were confiscated illegally. You do know that Banu Ummayah had personal wealth as well.”

Caliph Mansoor thought for a while and then addressed his chief of police: “This man is absolutely right. We have no authority to take away the wealth which was entrusted to him.”

He turned to the man and said: “If you have any need, speak up.”

The man requested: “I want to see those who complained to you about me. By Allah, I do not have anything belonging to Banu Ummayah – they never entrusted any wealth or weapon to me.”

Caliph Mansoor ordered for the complainant to be presented. When he arrived, the ‘offender’ exclaimed: “This is my slave! He borrowed five hundred Dinars from me and then ran away. I have written proof of this transaction.”

When Caliph Mansoor glared at the complainant, he admitted: “Yes, I am his slave, and I ran away after borrowing the Dinars. Then, I conspired against him and complained to you. I wanted him to be arrested and executed. But Allah (swt) made all my plans unsuccessful.”

“I have gifted the five hundred Dinars to him,” said the man. “And I give him five hundred more for coming here.”

The Caliph appreciated this gesture and both men left. Caliph Mansoor would later remember this man and the way he successfully argued with him.

Adapted (with permission) from “Sunehray Huroof” published by “Darussalam”. Translated and compiled for Hiba by Umm Ibrahim.

The Best Witness

best witness

By Abdul Malik Mujahid – General Manager, Darussalam Publishers and Distributors

The following story was narrated by the Prophet (sa) to his companions. It was transmitted to us through a Hadeeth narrated by Abu Hurairah (rta), recorded in Sahih Bukhari.

There was once a man in Bani Israel, who requested a fellow Israeli for a loan of one thousand Dinars. The creditor said: “Please bring two or three men with you, who can witness this transaction, and I will give you the loan.” The debtor said: “Allah (swt) is the best witness.” The creditor again said: “At least bring one responsible person, who can give your guarantee.” The debtor said: “Allah (swt) is the best of those who guarantee.” The creditor admitted: “You are right.” Thus, he gave him the loan which was to be returned within a specific period of time.

The debtor went overseas and spent the money on his needs. Thereafter, he started looking for a ship for his return journey. He wanted to return and repay the loan. However, he was unable to find any means of transport.

Finally, he took a piece of wood and made it into a box with a lid. Opening the lid, he kept one thousand Dinars along with a letter. Then, he sealed the box, stood on the shore and said: “O Allah! You know very well that I took a loan of one thousand Dinars from so-and-so. He asked me to bring witnesses or serve a guarantee. But I trusted You as the best witness, and he ultimately agreed with me. You know I have tried very hard to find some means of transport for my return journey, but have been unable to do so. Now, I am entrusting You with this Amanah. Do take it back to him only.”

With these words, the debtor put the box in the sea and saw it being carried away by the waves. Then, he turned back and resumed his search for a ship to take him back.

When the period, for which the loan had been granted was over, the creditor set out towards the sea. He thought the debtor might arrive through a ship or send it through a passenger. Suddenly, he caught sight of a wooden box. He picked it up and took it home, thinking the wood might come useful to light a fire. When he came home and sawed the wood, he saw the letter and the money.

After some time, the debtor came to the creditor with the money (since he didn’t know whether or not he had received the amount sent earlier). He said to the creditor: “By Allah, I was constantly in search for transport so that I could return you your money. However, I could not find any ship in time.”

The creditor asked: “Had you sent anything for me?”

The debtor replied: “That’s what I am trying to explain. I could not find any transport to arrive here on time.”

The creditor then informed him: “Allah (swt) made sure that the money you had returned reached me safely. There is no need to give me these additional one thousand Dinars. You have already repaid your loan.”

Adapted (with permission) from “Sunehray Huroof” published by “Darussalam”. Translated and compiled for “Hiba” by Umm Ibrahim.

Generous! Oh Really?

A Loser’s Gain

By Abdul Malik Mujahid – General Manager, Darussalam

Muan Ibn Zaida was a very wealthy man during the period of the Ummayads. He was also very well-known for his generosity. When the Abbasids took over from the Ummayads, he was forced to go into hiding. The following incident happened, while he was in hiding.

He was on his way out of Baghdad in disguise, when he realized that a man was following him. That man pursued him and caught up with him in a deserted area outside the city. He took hold of the camel’s reins and forced himself on its back. Once he was on the camel, he grabbed Muan with a knife in his hand.

Muan pleaded: “Why have you grabbed me? What do you want?” The man replied: “You are Muan! Ameer ul-Mumineen Mansoor is looking for you.”

Muan pretended to be surprised: “Me? Muan? You must be mistaken. I am an ordinary man.” The man snapped: “Don’t try to be smart. I know you very well, and you can’t run away. See my knife?” Muan begged him to let him go, but to no avail. Finally, he took out an expensive necklace from one of his concealed pockets and said: “What will Mansoor give you when you take me to him? This necklace is much more valuable than any prize he will give you. Take this and let me go.”

The man took the necklace and examined it. Then, he declared: “It does seem that this necklace is very expensive. However, I will not take it.” Muan asked: “Why?” He shook his head and said: “Let me ask you a few questions. If you answer correctly, I will let you go.” Muan agreed: “Ok, what do you want to know?”

The man asked: “You are known to be very generous. Have you ever given your entire wealth in charity?” Muan replied: “No, that has never happened.” The man asked: “Have you ever given half of your wealth in charity?” Muan answered: “No.” The man queried: “How about one-third?” Muan said: “No.” The man kept on decreasing the amount till it came to one-tenth. At that point, Muan was so frustrated that to shut him up, he said yes, he has given one-tenth of his wealth in charity. However, he was also feeling extremely ashamed of himself: he was known to be extremely generous but had not even given half of his wealth in charity.

The man continued: “This is nothing to be proud of. Listen, I am an ordinary man. I don’t own horses; I do not have piles of Dinars and Dirhams. I get twenty Dirhams from Caliph Mansoor on a monthly basis. Without doubt, the necklace you have given me is worth around twenty thousand Dirhams.” Saying this, he returned the necklace. “I spare your life and your necklace. I will not hand you over to Caliph Mansoor. This is only because you are known to be generous. Remember: never be proud of the fact that you are charitable. This is because there are people who are more benevolent than you. Consider your charity to be ordinary, regardless of the amount you give. Also, never abandon your generosity.” With that, he got off the camel and started to walk away.

Muan called him back: “You have drowned me in a sea of embarrassment. It would have been easier to get killed, rather than listen to what you have just said. Take this necklace.” The man laughed: “Do you want me to go back on my word? By Allah, I will not take this necklace. I will not seek the reward for my good deed in this world.” Taking huge steps, he went away.

Muan later admitted: “I always remembered that man and his wisdom. When Caliph Mansoor pardoned me and I recovered my wealth, I searched for him to repay him in kind. However, I was unable to locate him. In any case, I remembered his Ihsan to me that day, especially his Naseehah that I should remember that there are people who are more generous than me.”

Adapted (with permission) from Sunehray Huroof published by Darussalam. Translated and compiled for Hiba by Umm Ibrahim.

Dealing with Innovators

Dealing with Innovators

Three men – Abu Bakr, Abu Bakr Al-Admi and their friend – went for Hajj together. After they had performed all the rites of Hajj, they decided to visit Madinah.

One day, in Madinah, the friend came to Abu Bakr and said: “There is a blind man in the mosque of the Prophet (sa). He is narrating fabricated incidents and weak Ahadeeth to a large audience. We really should go and stop him from doing so, as he is misleading the public.”

Abu Bakr pondered for a while and then replied: “I really do not think that people will listen to us and disregard the more interesting details that the blind man has to tell them. After all, this is not Baghdad. We are well-known there and so is our credibility. Here, we are merely travelers. No one knows us, and if we try and argue with him, no one would support us. We will have to think of another way to handle this.”

Suddenly, an idea occurred to him. He realized that Abu Bakr Al-Admi recites the Quran beautifully. All three of them went to the mosque of the Prophet (sa). There, Abu Bakr Al-Admi was requested to start reciting the Quran in a loud voice.

When he began to recite, people automatically began to gather around him. Attracted by his voice and Qirat, the people attending the blind man’s study circle also got up and came here instead. Soon, there was no one around the blind man.

He sighed and asked his assistant to lead him home, saying: “Blessings are taken away in a second.”

This story contains an important lesson for all of us in these times. Instead of fighting over our differences, it is always a good idea to think of more creative and peaceful ways to resolve those differences, such that the right prevails over the wrong.

Adapted (with permission) from Sunehray Huroof published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Hafsa Ahsan.

The Value of the Oppressed

Apr 11 - The value of the oppressed

Caliph Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz was the nephew and son-in-law of Caliph Abdul Malik Ibn Marwan. His mother Umm Asim was the grand daughter of Umar Ibn Khattab (rta). His father Abdul-Aziz governed Egypt for twenty-one years. Waleed appointed Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz as the governor of Madinah. In 99 Hijri, upon the death of Caliph Sulaiman Ibn Abdul Malik and as per his will, Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz was appointed as the succeeding Caliph.

During his caliphate, Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz had arranged for the plundered property to be returned to its rightful owners, ensured the effectiveness and operation of the state treasury and restored the integrity of Caliph Ali (rta), who was earlier slandered in sermons.

In 101 Hijri, with the assistance and wicked scheming of some influential men, Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz was poisoned and killed. But his short reign of two years is considered to be a historic one with regard to his achievements, success and popularity as a capable ruler.

Following is one of the many stories of the caliph’s sense of justice that won him people’s hearts.

Once, Caliph Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz was roaming in the market of Hamas. Suddenly, a man adorning a striped wrap approached him. He said: “O, Amir-ul-Mumineen! You have commanded the oppressed to come to you for justice!”

Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz replied: “Yes! Indeed.”

The man continued: “Hence, a man who has been wronged has come to you travelling from a faraway land.”

Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz questioned him: “Where is your family?”

The man replied: “Further from the province in Yemen.”

Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz responded: “By Allah! Your family is far from the family of Umar.” And he climbed down immediately from his mount. He further inquired: “How have you been oppressed?”

The traveler answered: “A man has illegally occupied my land, on which I used to grow grains, and evicted me.”

After listening to the man’s complaint, Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz wrote to Urwa Ibn Mohammad that he should pay heed to the man’s complaint, and when he would be proved right, Urwa should ensure that the man’s land was rightfully returned to him. Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz placed a seal on his letter, finalizing his orders.

When the stranger prepared to leave, Caliph Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz questioned him: “Wait! Since you have travelled from far, what expenses did you have to incur for your journey or how much did you have to pay for your ride and how many clothes did you change?”

When an estimate was prepared, it came to approximately 15 Dinars. Umar Ibn Abdul-Aziz paid the traveller his money and set him off for his journey back home. Subhan’Allah!

Adapted (with permission) from “Sunehray Faislay” published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Rana Rais Khan.

A Potential Spouse’s Tough Exam

01-01In January, 2001, while I was going towards Paris from the airport, I was thinking about the Muslim community in this city. I was particularly wondering, how parents raise their children. I asked my friend Aamir Aqaad: “How do parents ensure that their children stay connected to Deen in this environment?”

Aamir has been a resident of Paris for two decades. He came here from Syria to study and then opened a publishing house of Islamic books. He mulled over my question and then replied:

“A very interesting incident happened a few days ago, which might answer your question. One of my relatives has been a resident of Paris for many years. He was working but was still unmarried. One day, he asked me if I could recommend anyone for marriage.

I knew a Moroccan family and spoke to them on my friend’s behalf. It seemed like a very compatible match. The girl was in her early twenties, educated and intelligent. Her parents liked the guy, but said that they would reach a decision after consulting their daughter. Finally, it was decided that both of them should see each other in person and have a brief meeting.

A railway station was selected as the venue. My wife and I, along with the girl’s parents, sat at some distance from the potential couple to give them some privacy while keeping them under observation. I saw that the girl took out some papers from her purse and handed them over to the potential suitor.

I was astounded. I had no idea that in this day and age, there were girls who were so in love with their Deen.

I was quite astonished and asked the girl’s mother what her daughter was doing. The mother replied that her daughter had prepared a questionnaire to quiz her potential spouse about his personal life. In the light of his answers, she would decide whether or not to say yes to his proposal.

Most of the questions had been prepared in French, a language in which my friend was not so fluent. He called me over to help him translate the questionnaire. The questionnaire spanned over three pages. The first page consisted of questions regarding personal life – name, father’s name, address, height, weight, educational qualifications, occupation, status of house (rent or own), salary, work hours, etc.

When we moved on to the second page, the questions were: What is the nature of your relationship with Islam and your Deen? Are you regular with your Salah? How much time do you dedicate to your Deen? How much of the Quran have you memorized? How often do you recite the Quran? Which books of Ahadeeth have you read? How many Ahadeeth have you memorized? Write one page on “Rights of Spouses.” Which book of Seerah are you currently reading? Which Halaqah (study circle) do you attend? Who’s the scholar leading this Halaqah? Which books have you studied in this circle?

I was astounded. I had no idea that in this day and age, there were girls who were so in love with their Deen.

The questions went on: Do you want children? Would you like sons or daughters? What will you name your first child? What kind of qualities would you like your wife to possess?

The entire questionnaire was designed, so as to get a complete picture of the kind of person my friend was. My friend filled out this questionnaire to the best of his efforts. Unfortunately, the girl was not too impressed with the answers and declined the proposal. She told her parents that an individual, who was not sincere with his Rabb (swt), can never be sincere with his wife.”

After hearing this, I was thinking of all the problems that girls face in their marital life. If only they quiz their potential spouse about his level of Deen beforehand, they could easily avoid the problems which come afterwards.

Adapted from “Sunehri Kirnain”, published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Hafsa Ahsan.

Let’s Enrage Him

Oct 10 - Let's enrage him

There was once a man in Arabia called Muan Ibn Zaida. He was very famous for his generosity as well as his mild temper. It was well-known amongst the Arabs that no one could provoke him.

One day, an Arab man claimed: “I will make Muan lose his temper.”

“Well,” said the people, “if you manage to do that, we will give you a hundred red camels.”

The Arab went to Muan. He walked in very rudely and without saying “Assalamu Alaikum” started to recite a few verses which meant, “Do you remember the time, when a goat’s skin was your dress and your shoes were made of camel skin?”

Muan did not mind the rude behaviour. He replied: “Of course, I have not forgotten that time.”

The Arab said: “Glory be to the One, Who gave you the power to rule and taught you how to sit on a bed.”

Muan said: “All praise is to Allah (swt) for that; not to you, my dear brother.”

The Arab said: “By Allah (swt), if you were supporting me, I could not survive one day. Also, I am not impressed with your rule, so I don’t offer you Salam.”

“My dear brother,” said Muan, “saying Salam is a Sunnah. If you obey it, you will receive blessings from Allah (swt). And if you do not say Salam, then you will be sinning.”

“I will leave the very land in which you are living, even if I have to walk all the way,” the Arab continued.

“If you stay here, you will only receive good treatment from us,” said Muan. “And if you leave, our Duas are with you.”

“Well then,” said the Arab. “I am definitely leaving. Arrange for my travel expenses.”

Muan asked his servant to give the Arab one thousand Dinars.

The Arab said: “This is too little. I expected much more from you.”

Muan asked his servant to give him another thousand Dinars.

Now, the Arab admitted his defeat and said: “May Allah (swt) grant you a long life, as your generosity is equivalent to a sea. You are the epitome of Ihsan. I have never met anyone like you before.”

Muan asked his servant to give him another thousand Dinars.

The Arab now explained: “I had heard you were mild tempered, so I came here just to test your patience. I am convinced that you are extremely generous and mild tempered. If your two qualities were distributed amongst every individual on this Earth, they would be enough for them.”

Muan gave the Arab another three thousand Dinars. The Arab thanked him and turned to leave. He was now crying.

Muan called him back and asked: “Why are you crying?”

“I am crying because even a man like you has to die one day,” he replied. “Losing one’s wealth and animals is not such a big deal. But when a generous man dies, quite a lot perishes with him, too.”

Adapted (with permission) from Sunehray Huroof published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Hafsa Ahsan.

The Governor’s Son is whipped!

Jul 10 - The governor's son is whipped

Amr Ibn Al-Aas (rta) was the governor of Egypt during Umar Ibn Khattab’s (rta) caliphate. He belonged to one of the tribes of Quraish called Banu Saham. He entered the fold of Islam in 8 AH. The Prophet (sa) sent him towards Oman, and Amr Ibn Al-Aas’s (rta) preaching inspired the ruler to accept Islam.

He was an eloquent speaker, very soft spoken, a writer, thinker, politician and commander-in-chief. He has narrated thirty-nine Ahadeeth.

One day, a citizen of Egypt approached Umar (rta) and complained to him: “O Amir-ul-Mumineen! I have come to you to seek shelter from cruelty.”

Umar (rta) replied: “You have come to a man who has the power to grant you shelter.”

The Egyptian continued: “I participated in a race with Amr Ibn Al-Aas’s (rta) son. When I went ahead of him, he started to whip me and cried out: ‘I am the son of a noble family.’”

Upon hearing the complaint, Umar (rta) wrote a letter to Amr Ibn Al-Aas (rta) and summoned him along with his son.

When Amr Ibn Al-Aas (rta) and his son appeared before him, Umar (rta) inquired: “Where is the Egyptian?”

When he appeared before Umar (rta) too, he commanded the Egyptian: “Take this whip and hit him.”

As soon as the Amir-ul-Mumineen ordered the Egyptian to do so, he started to whip Amr Ibn Al-Aas’s (rta) son. Umar (rta) kept on repeating: “Whip the son of the noble family.”

Anas (rta) narrates: “By Allah (swt)! The Egyptian whipped the governor’s son fiercely, and we all wanted him to do so. However, after some time, we wished that he stopped.”

Then Umar (rta) ordered: “Whip Amr Ibn Al-Aas’s (rta) bald head too.”

The Egyptian said: “O Amir-ul-Mumineen! His son whipped me, and I have avenged him by way of Qisas.”

Then, Umar (rta) addressed Amr Ibn Al-Aas (rta): “Since when have you enslaved your people, when their mothers had borne them free?”

Amr Ibn Al-Aas (rta) clarified: “O Amir-ul-Mumineen! I was not aware of this incident and this man never brought his complaint to me.”

This is how justice was served during the caliphate of the Muslims. The son of a governor, belonging to a noble family, was commanded to be whipped before his own father’s eyes and that too by a common man, who had been wronged. Shariah laws protected the innocent and set an unprecedented example for others to stay within limits.

Adapted from “Sunehray Faislay”, published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Rana Rais Khan.

The Fruit of a False Testimony

Vol 7 - Issue 1 The fruit of a false testimony

Once, Al-Haaj Ibrahim was approached by a friend for a loan. The friend promised to return it before the end of the year. Al-Haaj gave the loan and entered the transaction in his accounts. His friend offered to mortgage something against the loan. Al-Haaj refused, stating that since he was a dear friend and Allah (swt) was a Witness between them, a mortgage was not needed.

Before the year ended, Al-Haaj had a sudden heart attack and died. He left behind a widow and four children.

One day, Al-Haaj’s wife checked his accounts to see the details of his debtors and creditors. She came across the entry of the loan he had granted to his friend. The wife sent a message to Al-Haaj’s friend, requesting him to return the loan. The friend denied ever taking a loan from Al-Haaj. When she insisted and pursued the matter, he changed his statement and said that he had actually returned the loan much earlier and that was why he couldn’t even remember the incident.

When the news spread, public opinion was divided into two groups: one group supported Al-Haaj, while the other was on his friend’s side.

Al-Haaj’s widow approached the influential members of the society for assistance, but to no avail. Losing all hope, she filed a case against this man in the court.

After hearing both parties, the judge said: “This man claims to have returned the loan. He has a witness, who has testified that once the loan was granted to this man by Al-Haaj, the man mentioned to him how relieved he was due to the kind gesture of Al-Haaj. However, we have no proof or witness to substantiate the fact that the borrowed loan was actually returned to Al-Haaj. In such a case, the accused is required to take an oath by the Quran and confirm that he had indeed returned the borrowed loan.”

The accused man took a false oath by the Quran. Consequently, the court acquitted him. As the man proudly stepped out of the court room, he suddenly fell to the ground. This man, who had been hale and hearty just a few seconds ago, had dropped dead before everyone’s eyes.

The narrator of this story was Al-Haaj’s neighbour. He was also present during the trial and was deeply shocked by the sudden demise of this young man. He visited Al-Haaj’s house and spoke to Al-Haaj’s wife from behind the veil.

She said: “My husband was a pious man. He always lent people a helping hand. He used to lend money to all – the rich and the poor. Later, as per the Prophet’s (sa) Hadeeth, he wrote off the loans of the destitute and allowed time to the rich to pay off their borrowed money. He kept the accounts of all such transactions. He rarely asked the borrowers to sign for the funds they took. I advised him to do so many times, but he would answer me: ‘The money that I have belongs to Allah (swt). There was a time, when I was poor. It was Allah (swt), Who enriched me.’

On the day of the verdict, I was also present in the courtroom. When that man took a false oath and the judge acquitted him, I cried out in horror. I knew that he had lied and had dared to mock Allah’s (swt) Book. At that very moment I cursed him: ‘O Allah! You are the Knower of all that is evident and all that is concealed. You are also the Knower of the Unknown. If this man is a liar, make him an example for others to fear, oh Mighty Lord!’

I saw him die before my eyes in the court. He was acquitted by the judge, but could not escape the ultimate King of the heavens and the earth.

One cold night, at the door, stood his graceful widow. She admitted to me that her husband had lied in the court. She had tried to persuade him to return the loan, but he didn’t listen. Eventually, he paid a heavy price for his treachery. She had come to return the loan – she handed over the borrowed money to me and left.”

Adapted from “Sunehray Faislay” published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Rana Rais Khan.

Ali (rta) vs. a Jew

Vol 6 - Issue 4 Ali rta vs a jew

Once, during his Caliphate, Ali Ibn Abi Talib (rta) lost his armour. One day, he saw a Jew in possession of an armour he recognized as his own. Ali (rta) approached the Jew and asked him to return his armour. The Jew refused to do so and, instead, demanded that the matter be settled by the reigning Muslim Qadi (judge).

Hence, Ali (rta) and the Jew appeared before the Qadi to settle this dispute. Qadi Shurayh was a very competent judge from Yemen, who was famous for settling Fiqh related matters. He had performed the duties of a Qadi in Kufa during the caliphate of Umar Ibn Khattab (rta), and Usman Ibn Affan (rta) as well. He was well known for his integrity and insight.

When the judge saw Caliph Ali (rta) approach his court, he stood up for him out of respect. Ali (rta) requested him to stay seated. Qadi Shurayh took his seat. Ali (rta) initiated the conversation: “I have lost my armour and found the same in this man’s possession.”

Qadi Shurayh asked the Jew: “Do you have anything to say?”

The Jew replied: “This is my armour and I own it.”

Qadi Shurayh inspected the armour in dispute and addressed the Caliph: “By Allah! Your claim is correct. This, indeed, is your armour. However, the court of law demands that you produce two witnesses to substantiate your claim.”

Ali (rta) produced his slave Qanbar as his first witness, who testified in favour of Ali (rta). Then, the Caliph produced his sons Hassan (rta) and Hussain (rta) as his second witnesses to testify for him.

Qadi Shurayh stated: “I accept the testimony of your slave; however, I still need another witness, as the testimony of your sons is not acceptable.”

The Caliph said: “By Allah! I heard Umar Ibn Khattab (rta) narrate the Prophet’s (sa) Hadeeth stating that Hassan (rta) and Hussain (rta) are the leaders of the youth in Paradise.”

The judge replied: “By Allah! This is the truth.”

Ali (rta) demanded: “Then why are you unable to accept the testimony of the leaders of the youth in Paradise?”

Qadi Shurayh explained: “Because they are your sons, and a son cannot testify in favour of his father.”

Hence, the judge settled the dispute in favour of the Jew and handed over the armour to him.

The Jew remarked in absolute astonishment: “The Amir-ul-Momineen of the Muslims brought me in the court of his own appointed judge, and the same judge gave a verdict against the Caliph. And the Caliph accepted the verdict gracefully without any resistance.”

Then, the Jew glanced towards Ali (rta) and continued: “Amir-ul-Momineen! Your claim is true. This armour definitely belongs to you. You had lost it the other day and I found it. Therefore, it is your property. Please, accept it.”

The Jew then recited his Shahadah: “I testify that there is no God but Allah and Muhammad is His Messenger.”

Ali (rta), the wise and honourable Caliph, replied: “I give you not only my armour but also my horse.” 

Adapted from “Sunehray Faislay” published by Darussalam. Translated for “Hiba” by Rana Rais Khan.

Timely Justice

Vol 6 - Issue 3 Timely justice

One day, Umar (rta) was seated in Masjid Nabvi, when a man passed by saying: “O Umar! For you is the lowest level of Hell-fire.”

Umar (rta) ordered the witnesses surrounding him to bring this man to him. When the man was brought before him, Umar (rta) inquired: “Why did you say that?”

He replied: “When you appoint your rulers, you educate them regarding the principles they need to adhere to. Later on, you do not check, if they are abiding by those principles.”

Umar (rta) further inquired: “What is your complain?”

The man complained: “The ruler appointed by you in Egypt is acting against the principles you have set forth for him, and he is indulging into the forbidden.”

After listening to the entire case, Umar (rta) appointed two men from the tribe of Ansar to investigate the matter and sent them to Egypt. The investigators were to verify the issue from the common people of Egypt and bring the ruler of Egypt with them to Umar (rta) instantly, if the complaints against him were true.

Both men followed the Caliph’s orders and arrived in Egypt. They initiated their investigations and discovered that all allegations against him were true. Hence, they went to the ruler’s residence and requested to see him.

The ruler’s guard refused to let them in. The men warned the guard that they would break down the door, if not permitted to meet with the ruler. They also prepared a fire to do the same. Seeing that the matter was becoming serious, the guard quickly informed the ruler, who stepped out to meet the visitors.

The Ansaris asked the ruler to accompany them to meet Umar (rta). The ruler requested for time to take care of some business, before he could proceed for the journey. But the Ansaris informed them that they were not permitted to waste even a single moment. The ruler had to come along right away.

When the Ansaris brought the ruler to Umar (rta), the Egyptian ruler greeted the Caliph with Salam. Umar (rta) was unable to recognize the man standing before him. When he was appointed as a ruler, his complexion was quite dark; now, it was much fairer and he had put on weight as well.

Umar (rta) asked in surprise: “Who are you?”

The man replied: “I am the person, whom you appointed as the ruler of Egypt.”

Umar (rta) exclaimed: “Woe to you! You embraced what was declared forbidden for you and forgot what you were told to follow. By Allah! I will teach you a lesson you won’t forget.”

The Amir-ul-Mumineen ordered to bring a torn outfit made of wool, a stick and three hundred sheep that had been received as Sadaqah, and addressed the Egyptian ruler: “Wear this outfit, for I had seen your father wear a much more worn out garment than this one. Pick up this staff, as it is much better than the staff your father used to carry. Take these sheep to so-and-so place, where you will have to herd them.”

Umar (rta) continued: “And do not prevent any travellers from drinking the milk of these sheep, except my own family, as I do not recall permitting them to partake any milk or meat, which was donated as Sadaqah.”

As the Egyptian ruler turned to leave, Umar (rta) summoned him and asked: “Is everything clear to you?”

The ruler knelt to the ground and cried: “O Amir-ul-Mumineen! I won’t be able to carry out this task. You may chop my head off, if you so wish.”

Umar (rta) asked him: “If I reinstate you as a ruler, what will your conduct be like?”

He replied: “By Allah! From now on, you will hear only that about my conduct, which pleases you.”

Umar (rta), hence, reinstated him as the ruler of Egypt. True to his word, the man proved to be an exemplary ruler of Egypt, conducting all his affairs with Taqwa and sincerity.

Adapted from “Sunehray Faislay” published by Darussalam. Translated by Rana Rais Khan.